dispersion

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dispersion

 [dis-per´zhun]
1. the act of scattering or separating; the condition of being scattered.
2. the incorporation of the particles of one substance into the body of another, comprising solutions, suspensions, and colloid systems.
3. a colloid system, particularly an unstable one.

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn),
1. The act of dispersing or of being dispersed. Synonym(s): dispersal
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution.
4. The extent or degree in which values of a statistical frequency distribution are scattered about a mean or median value.
[L. dispersio]

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn)
1. The act of dispersing or of being dispersed.
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution
4. The extent or degree to which values of a statistical frequency distribution are scattered about a mean or median value.
[L. dispersio]

dispersion

the distribution of individual organisms once any DISPERSAL has taken place. For example, organisms may be randomly dispersed, under-dispersed (aggregated) or over-dispersed (as in territorial animals). Dispersion should not be confused with DISTRIBUTION which normally refers to a species as a whole and not to individuals.

dispersion

Phenomenon of the change in velocity of propagation of radiation in a medium, as a function of its frequency, which causes a separation of the monochromatic components of a complex radiation. All optical media cause dispersion by virtue of their variation of refractive index with wavelengths. Dispersion is specified by the difference in the refractive index of the medium for two wavelengths. The difference between the blue F (486.1 nm) and the red C (656.3 nm) spectral lines is called the mean dispersion, i.e. nFnC. Dispersion is usually represented by its dispersive power ω or relative dispersion which is equal to the mean dispersion divided by the excess refractive index of the helium d (587.6 nm) spectral line (nd − 1), often called the refractivity of the material,
ω = nFnC/nd − 1
The reciprocal of the dispersive power is called the Abbé's number or constringence (Fig. D8). See aberration longitudinal chromatic; achromatic axis; Fraunhoffer's lines; achromatic prism.
Fig. D8 Dispersion of a white beam of light by a prismenlarge picture
Fig. D8 Dispersion of a white beam of light by a prism

dis·per·sion

(dis-pĕr'zhŭn)
1. Dispersing or being dispersed.
2. Incorporation of the particles of one substance into the mass of another, including solutions, suspensions, and colloidal dispersions (solutions).
3. Specifically, what is usually called a colloidal solution
[L. dispersio]
References in periodicals archive ?
A multimode fiber probe and a single-mode fiber probe are both used to improve flexibility and measuring ability of the system.
In the same fashion as couplers are made from single-mode fibers, couplers can also be made from multimode fibers. The major difference is that when a star coupler is made from multimode fibers, many fibers can be fused at one time.
"This demonstration illustrates the viability of multicore multimode fiber as a transmission medium for next-generation high-performance computer networks," said Dr.
Cellular presented a solution that would not work with the existing multimode fiber, Keatley and his team chose the InterReach Fusion system from LGC Wireless.
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Because the MADI consoles used by the BBC support multimode fiber, Niall Young, Broadcasting Network Director at the BBC, needed a multimode to single mode converter in his "mobile tool-kit".
From a fiber perspective, throughout the past five years there has been rapid growth in acceptance of laser-optimized multimode fiber as an alternative to traditional multimode and singlemode fiber.
The system is available in one- and two-fiber versions for use with either single-mode or multimode fiber and operates at wavelengths of 850, 1310, or 1550 nm.
Light is coupled into the detector stage through a multimode optical fiber pigtail, allowing coupling with either singlemode or multimode fiber systems.

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