multiform

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multiform

 [mul´tĭ-form]
occurring in many forms; polymorphic.

pol·y·mor·phic

(pol'ē-mōr'fik),
Occurring in more than one form.
[G. polymorphos, multiform]

pol·y·mor·phic

(pol'ē-mōr'fik)
Occurring in more than one form.
Synonym(s): multiform, pleomorphic (1) , pleomorphous, polymorphous.
[G. polymorphos, multiform]
References in periodicals archive ?
Erasmus emphasizes Proteus's multiformity and shape shifting; by contrast, whenever Bacon evokes the Proteus myth, he fixates on the capture and enchaining of the old god.
To this end, in subsequent chapters of his monograph he stresses the role of multiformity in the oral traditions preserved in the DtrH and Chronicles.
* HARAKAS, Stanley Samuel, European Multiformity and Dimensions of Orthodox Christian Social Ethics in George P.
way that translators reminded Late Antique readers of the multiformity
Premature ventricular beats are usually asymptomatic, and it appears that isolated premature beats themselves in the setting of MI, regardless of frequency or multiformity, are not associated with an increased risk of sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmia.
Jelsma, ed., Unity in Multiformity: The Minutes of the Coetus of London, 1575 and the Consistory Minutes of the Italian Church of London, 1570-1591 (London: The Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, 1997), 58, 60-61, 62, 64-66, 68, 78, 80-81, 85-89, 105-6, 108-10.
By failing to study this relationship, by forgetting it, by denying it, we blind ourselves to not only 'the multiformity of the legal tradition ...
How might the multiformity and irregularity of melodic guidance in Javanese music be useful for studying other kinds of music?
(7) This multiformity and ambiguity is repeated in Philo and Josephus (General human weakness: Leg.
The multiformity of his creative output--paintings, drawings, watercolours, pastels, bronzes, not to mention his prolific writings--was astounding.
Vanhole has indeed outspoken opinions--he is clearly in favor of multiformity and multicultural cohabitation--but by never pretending to have an answer to all the problems facing a twenty-first-century European government, he skilfully avoids the trap so many tendentious novels fall into.
Owing to their openness and multiformity, outstanding literary texts may indeed, as Paul Smith reminds us with reference to Warren Beck's reading of Hemingway's story, imagine more than their authors are aware of.