mud

(redirected from mud snail)
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Drug slang A regionally popular street term for opium or heroin
Molecular biology A defective derivative of phage Mu; mud insertions are used to construct operon and gene fusions in enteric bacteria
Vox populi A popular term for very strong coffee or espresso

donor

(do'nor) [Fr. doneur fr L. donator, giver, donor]
1. A person or animal that furnishes blood, tissue, or an organ to be used in another person.
2. In chemistry, a compound that frees part of itself to unite with another compound called an acceptor.

artificial insemination donor

Abbreviation: AID
A male who provides sperm to be used to fertilize a woman seeking to become pregnant.

blood donor

One who gives blood (or its components) to be used for transfusion.

cadaveric donor

One who donates an organ or tissue after his or her death.

directed donor

A family member, friend, or significant other who gives blood, an organ, or tissue to another person to support a vital function or prevent death.

HLA-mismatched related donor

Mismatched related donor.

human leukocyte antigen matched unrelated donor

Matched unrelated donor.

hydrogen donor

In oxidation-reduction reactions, a substance that gives up hydrogen atoms to another substance, the acceptor.
See: hydrogen acceptor

living donor

One who donates an organ or tissue while he or she is still living. Living donors must be healthy and antigenically matched to the recipient.

matched unrelated donor

Abbreviation: MUD
One who donates an organ or tissue (such as bone marrow stem cells) to another person with human leukocyte antigens identical to those of the organ recipient.
Synonym: human leukocyte antigen matched unrelated donor

mismatched related donor

Abbreviation: MMRD
An organ or tissue donor who is a family member of the organ recipient but whose human leukocyte antigens are not identical to those of the recipient. In general in organ transplantation, organ and recipient survival are highest when the donor and the recipient share the same HLA antigens.
Synonym: HLA-mismatched related donor

nondirected donor

A person who donates blood, an organ, or tissue to the community at large and is unknown to the recipient.

related HLA-identical donor

Related identical donor.

related identical donor

Abbreviation: RID
A family member who donates an organ or tissue (such as a kidney or bone marrow stem cells) to another family member who shares perfectly matched human leukocyte antigens. Organ transplantations from RIDs have higher success rates than transplants obtained from mismatched related donors (MMRDs) or from matched unrelated donors (MUDs).
Synonym: related HLA-identical donor

universal donor

A person who has group O red blood cells. In a life-threatening emergency this person's cells can be transfused into any patient in need of red blood cells.

matched unrelated donor

Abbreviation: MUD
One who donates an organ or tissue (such as bone marrow stem cells) to another person with human leukocyte antigens identical to those of the organ recipient.
Synonym: human leukocyte antigen matched unrelated donor
See also: donor

mud

pertaining to or emanating from wet conditions underfoot.

mud fever
said of horses affected by dermatophilosis, leptospirosis, greasy heel.
mud snail
lymnaeatruncatula.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most (> 70%) and perhaps all of the conjugates of testosterone generated by the mud snail are fatty acid esters (Gooding and LeBlanc 2001).
Growth and longevity of the mud snail Batillaria attramentaria.
Boatner has glued 18 of the mud snails to a wading boot and has yet to have anyone detect all 18, he said.
These results suggest that mud snails can control abundance of their food, which means, perhaps, that field densities are poised at a level that does not deplete the food supply.
To simulate the natural posture of a mud snail siphon tip, we positioned microelectrode sensors facing downward 1-2 mm above the creek bed.
Behavioral and ecological importance of a mud snail (Ilyanassa obsoleta) population in a temperate macrotidal estuary.
Transported as easily as a single grain of sand stuck to waders or felt-soled boots, the New Zealand mud snail clones itself.
gemma, polychaetes, and eastern mud snails were juveniles.
Flukes are able to survive only where their intermediate host, fresh-water mud snails of the genus Lymnaea, is present.
Not at snails pace: An angler found New Zealand Mud Snails in Putah Creek this fall downstream from Lake Berryessa in Northern California.