pool of mucin

(redirected from mucin lake)

pool of mucin

A nonspecific term for a mucinous “pool” seen by light microscopy in connective tissue in advancing age or in degenerative disease, in the peritoneum in a mucocele of the appendix or in protein-rich, lightly basophilic material admixed with adenocarcinoma cells in colorectal and breast colloid carcinomas.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The transitional zone of the prostate gland comprised a macrolobulated heterogeneous hyperintense mass with a hypointense capsule on T2-weighted images (WIs) (Figure 1) The prostatic mass exhibited central and peripherally hyperintense areas within the mass on T1-WIs, compatible with mucin lakes (Figure 2).
A criterion for the diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma is a primary prostatic acinar tumor with the presence of at least >25% of an excised tumor consisting of tumor cells and clusters of cells floating in mucin lakes (5,6,7,8).
We present a case of classic lobular carcinoma but with the rare characteristic of extracellular mucin lakes. This feature is rare but has been documented previously in the literature [2-7].
Mucinous carcinoma is histologically characterized by nests of tumor cells floating in mucin lakes with fine fibrovascular septae.
Caption: Figure 2: (a and b) Hematoxylin and Eosin stain: tumor was mainly composed of mucin lakes containing cords and nests of the tumor cells and some lakes bearing only signet-ring cells.
Tumor was considered as mucinous carcinoma if the mucin lakes represented more than 50% of the tissue.
Microscopically, distended glands showing fragmentation were seen floating in mucin lakes (Fig.
The post chemoradiation MRI findings suggested features of perforation masking the "mucin lakes".
Microscopy showed infiltrative moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with abundant extracellular mucin comprising more than 50% with mucin lakes formation focally and detached free floating malignant cells.
Two cases of MC (13%) had an almost exclusive colloid pattern, characterized by well-defined mucin lakes in which carcinoma cells were seen floating within the mucin but not clinging to the stroma (Figure 1).
In theses cases, the scant floating strips of malignant epithelium in mucin lakes are not always evident on a 2-dimensional tissue section, and deeper sections of areas of suspicion may uncover malignant glands (Figure 2, A and B).
Some malignant ducts were distended with mucin, and scattered small mucin lakes were present, some containing a few small groups of floating tumor cells (Figure 3).