mrem


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to mrem: millirem

millirem

 (mrem) [mil´ĭ-rem]
one thousandth (10−3) of a rem.

mrem

abbr.
millirem
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 3 shows that the first area of the body to be affected by exposures above 75,000 mrem is the tissue in the intestinal lining, leading to nausea, diarrhea, radiation burn, and general weakness.
Typical effective radiation doses Typical effective dose Study mrem mSv Skull radiographs 4-20 0.04-0.2 Lumbar spine 100-180 1-1.8 CT head 200 2 CT chest 800 8 CT abdomen/pelvis 1000 10 Trauma CT 1600 16 Table data adapted from multiple sources.
Consequently, an astronaut visiting Mars would absorb 6,000 to 20,000 mrem per year.
The OSL dosimeter can give an accurate recording of exposure as low as 1 mrem for x-ray and gamma ray photons, with energies ranging from 5 keV to more than 40 million electron volts (MeV).
At 25,000 mRem, the human body shows signs of impairment.
Thirteen months later, EPA issued a revised "two-tiered" standard under which maximum exposure beyond 10,000 years will be limited to 350 mrem per year, which is roughly equivalent to the average background exposure for individuals across the globe.
The annual limit on public exposure from a single source of ionizing radiation is 100 mrem (1 mSv), both in the United States and internationally.
Bending to anti-nuclear propaganda, the Environmental Protection Agency set our radiation safety standard ridiculously low, only 15 millirems per year, while residents of Ramsar, Iran, a resort over the Caspian Sea, are exposed to natural radiation of 26,000 mrem per year with no ill effects.
The average person is exposed to about 360 mrem (a unit used to measure the effect of radiation on the human body) a year from Radon, cosmic rays, soil, X-rays, cigarettes and even television.
The RR estimates for maximum gamma exposure ([less than or equal to] 8, 8-19, 20-34, [greater than or equal to] 35 mrem) in relation to all lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue (LHT) are significantly elevated (RRs = 1.00, 1.16, 2.54, 2.45, respectively) for males and are suggestive of a potential dose-response relationship, although the test for trend was not significant.
The average person in the United States is exposed to an effective dose equivalent of approximately 360 mrem per year ftom natural and technological radiation sources.