mover


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Related to mover: people mover

mover

/mov·er/ (moo´ver) that which produces motion.
prime mover  a muscle that acts directly to bring about a desired movement.

mov·er

(mūv'ĕr)
A person or thing that moves or causes to move.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apigee, an expert provider of API management and predictive analytics software, was named the Digital Transformation Mover of the Year Award while Gartner, a leading provider of technology research to global technology business leaders, was given the New Mover of the Year Award.
The typical price paid by home movers for a property has surged by 41% - from PS206,122 in 2012 to PS290,991 by June 2017 - an increase of PS84,869.
The average deposit put down by a home mover has increased by 40% in the past five years, from PS68,663 in 2012 to PS96,109 in 2017.
In this regards, The Packers Movers acts as a reliable online platform for the ones seeking a hassle-free relocation experience anywhere across the nation.
We can determine when advertisers should engage with a mover based on our time sensitivity algorithm engine, as we track movers digitally through their move journey.
Considering the top three reasons for a move are new housing, family reasons and work, many of these movers will be making a move while dealing with the emotional strain of a death or divorce.
The University of Alaska Anchorage worked closely with People Mover on this project to ensure that UAA WolfCards are integrated with the new fareboxes.
For four years, new mover direct marketing has generated, on average, more than 200 first time visits a month for Hollywood Supermarkets.
Gary Matthews, the Wimbledon racing manager, said: "I've been informed by the GBGB [Greyhound Board of Great Britain] that Lyreen Mover returned a positive on May 29.
The voluntary trade is mutually welfare improving, but it requires the first party to forego something of value and risk not having the transaction completed; thus the first mover must trust that the second mover is trustworthy.
A fundamental break with this millennia-long pattern came only with widespread adoption of the first practical mechanical prime mover able to convert the heat of fuel combustion -- James Watt's improved steam engine, designed in the 1780s.