mouthstick

mouthstick

[mouth′stik]
a device that is gripped with the teeth and can be used to type, push buttons, turn pages, operate power wheelchairs, or modify environmental control units and other equipment. It is commonly used by individuals who have a high-level (C4 and up) tetraplegia. Also called chinstick.

mouthstick

Assistive technology device consisting of a stick attached to a molded dental mouthpiece that permits page turning and other tasks by means of head movement.

mouthstick,

n a device designed for use by quadriplegics and people with limited arm and hand mobility secondary to paralysis. The device fits into the oral cavity and enables the physically disabled to perform simple tasks such as dialing a telephone, using a computer keyboard, or turning the pages of a book.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking tracheostomy tube and modified mouthstick stylus in a ventilator-dependent patient with spinal cord injury.
This product is a combination of a capacitive mouthstick and a headpointer, allowing people with limited or no use of their hands to use an iPad and other tablet devices that have a capacitive touchscreen.
She teaches sailing to PVA members, showed a ventilator-dependent quad how to sail by using a mouthstick ("Captain Courageous," January 2011), and writes PN articles supporting veterans and nonveterans.
The keyguard is a lightweight overlay, often plastic, that fits over the regular keyboard; holes are punched out of the plastic so that each standard key can be pressed if chosen deliberately, either with the fingers or a mouthstick.
From the classic mouthstick to virtual reality, the individual has a smorgasbord of alternatives, limited only by imagination and funding.
Many people with mobility difficulties can use a standard keyboard by typing with one hand, one or several fingers, or even a handstick, mouthstick or head pointer.
If you wouldn't make the surface of PN's pages so slippery and hard to turn with a mouthstick (for those of us who use such a device to turn pages), we might be motivated to look at the whole issue
Chin, head, or mouthstick (the user sips/puffs into a tube located near the mouth) control can be used by people who are unable to use a joystick due to limited hand or arm movement.
that have simple controls and are mentally challenging and engaging are ideal for me because my mind moves as quickly as the next guy's, but I type with a mouthstick.
The pieces may need to be slid across a table top or other surface, either by the player's hand or by using a mouthstick or dowel, to assist in moving the pieces into place.
To input, a mouthstick [is] far faster than voice input.
Its height for head or mouthstick users should keep the head and shoulders well balanced over the spine (as much as possible per disability) to protect the user from gravity's oppressive effects.