rescue breathing

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Related to mouth-to-mouth: Mouth to mouth resuscitation

rescue breathing

n.
A technique used to resuscitate a person who has stopped breathing, in which the rescuer forces air into the victim's lungs at intervals of several seconds, usually by exhaling into the victim's mouth or nose or into a mask fitted over the victim's mouth.
Any of a number of life-saving manoeuvres in which a rescuer (R1) inflates the rescuee’s (R2) lungs by breathing into the R2’s airway access ‘port’; it is no longer considered optimal therapy for cardiac arrest. A 2006 report in Lancet compared CPR with and without rescue breathing and found a two-fold higher rate of survival in those who did not receive rescue breathing.
In early 2008, the American Heart Association changed its guidelines to include hands-only CPR, a new version using chest compressions only. Hands-only CPR is intended for untrained rescuers and only for witnessed cardiac arrest.

rescue breathing

Emergency medicine Any of a number of life-saving maneuvers in which a rescuer–R1 inflates the rescuee's–R2 lungs by breathing into the R2's airway access 'port'. See ABCs–of CPR, Head-tilt/Chin-lift maneuver.
Rescue breathing types
Mouth-to-mouth Airway is opened by the head-tilt/jaw-lift maneuver, nose is pinched by R1 who takes 2 deep breaths, seals his/her lips around R2's mouth and gives 2 full breaths–1 to 1.5 seconds/breath, allows good chest expansion, average volume 800 mL
Mouth-to-nose Used when there is major trauma to the face, trismus, or a tight mouth seal cannot be formed; airway is opened by the head-tilt/jaw-lift maneuver, mouth is closed by R1 who takes 2 deep breaths, seals his/her lips around R2's nose and gives 2 full breaths as above
Mouth-to-stoma Used in Pts who have undergone laryngectomy; R1 who takes 2 deep breaths, seals his/her lips around R2's stoma and breathes as above  

head-tilt/chin-lift ma·neu·ver

(hĕd'tilt-chin'lift mă-nū'vĕr)
Basic procedure used in cardiopulmonary resuscitation to open the patient's airway. Rescuers one hand tilts head back while other hand is placed under the chin to lift the mandible and displace the tongue.
Synonym(s): manual airway maneuver, rescue breathing.

head-tilt/chin-lift ma·neu·ver

(hĕd'tilt-chin'lift mă-nū'vĕr)
Basic procedure used in cardiopulmonary resuscitation to open the patient's airway.
Synonym(s): manual airway maneuver, rescue breathing.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I put him in the recovery position and tried to give him mouth-to-mouth."
"She was floppy, with her eyes closed - I placed her on the sofa and performed mouth-to-mouth on the child.
Mr Alexander was struggling to breathe, could not move and was in pain, so she told him to breathe gently and that she would give him mouth-to-mouth.
Luke said: "With guidance from the 999 operator, I had to perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on Jessica and after about five minutes I managed to get her breathing." Mum and baby were immediately taken to hospital where they were checked over and given a clean bill of health by medical experts.
Robert made sure Eve's airway was clear but she then stopped breathing and he had to give her mouth-to-mouth.
Cox, a registered nurse, performed mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on the man until paramedics arrived, The Daily Mirror reports.
Summary: CCTV: Aussie gives toddler life saving mouth-to-mouth in a supermarket.
The 60-year-old actor - who is famous for his role as heroic lifeguard Mitch Buchannon in the TV series - admitted he hates swimming and tries to avoid water where possible, although he does like giving mouth-to-mouth.
Vets revived her through chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
The first documented use of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation is in the Bible, where Elisha performs it on a child.
New guidelines for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) say Good Samaritans can skip mouth-to-mouth and instead perform only chest compressions on victims of cardiac arrest.
FOCUSING on chest compressions rather than mouth-to-mouth when giving emergency resuscitation can produce better results, researchers said.