mourn

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mourn

(mōrn),
To express grief or sorrow as a result of loss. In psychoanalysis, mourning is the frequently unexpressed process of responding to loss of a cathected object that, in contrast to melancholia, usually does not involve loss of self-esteem.
[O.E. murnan]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
New Delhi (India), Aug 16 ( ANI ): As the country mourns the death of former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee, the Central Government has announced a seven-day state mourning throughout the country.
On June 13, flags in government offices were at half-mast until June 16 to mourn and show respect for the victims of the Marawi siege.
-- HRH the Premier mourns late Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques and stresses with his death, the Arab and Islamic nations have lost a leader who dedicated his life to the nation and its issues.
mourns the loss of your son, husband, father, brother.To the Lebanese ArmyKhalass!
The images, formative for the collective memory of a generation, were accompanied by the Serbian dirge "Smrt u Dalasu" (Death in Dallas) by Jozo Karamatic, who mourns in this speech-song the 1963 death of the American president.
"A spiritually deadened person mourns over things that should bring celebration--and often celebrates things that should be mourned." He notes the biblical account: "As Jesus drew closer to Jerusalem, with the crowd's worship and praise ringing in his ears, he did a curious thing.
She mourns the untimely passing of the king, who died in the flower of his youth, and she curses the Fate Atropos for bringing an end to their "jeunes ans" of marriage.
Rather, she "closes" Homer by presenting Achilles "Prone on the shore [feeling] the pangs of love." Achilles mourns the irrecoverable loss of the man who signified/supplemented Achilles by repeating "his" marks.
Another text says the soul mourns the body for seven days, for "it cannot quit what it loves"; spirit laments matter, and misses it.
She wrings her hands (like wringing out the wash) trying to mourn the stranger lying there, remote in his final traveling clothes, the skull beneath his skin rising to the surface as surely as the moon's white skull rises at the window, snuffing out innocent stars.
Various answers for what the mark was have been offered--either a mark on Cain's forehead(2) or a blackening of Cain's face, connecting him with Ham as a father of the black race (Mellinkoff 77).(3) Cain himself has been called the mark, a pariah identifiable by his marked body--either his trembling, groaning, or incessant wandering.(4) Yet, what strikes me about the Cain myth, reading it in a hermeneutical and intertextual relationship to Morrison's Sula and Beloved, is Cain's complete refusal to remember and to mourn. Cain denies responsibility both for his brother and for his act: "Am I my brother's keeper?" (Genesis 4.9).