mourn


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mourn

(mōrn),
To express grief or sorrow as a result of loss. In psychoanalysis, mourning is the frequently unexpressed process of responding to loss of a cathected object that, in contrast to melancholia, usually does not involve loss of self-esteem.
[O.E. murnan]
References in periodicals archive ?
They make the primal sound that they did not make for Baby at her funeral: They mourn. Meanwhile, Mr.
If your name isn't on the list-breathe, grieve and mourn, heal.
-- At an order by HM the King, the Royal Court mourns late Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques.
The failure to mourn power that is crumbling is rampant among the Catholic monarchy.
So, amazingly, blessed are those who mourn, for when we mourn, we are living in Christ, allowing Jesus' life to live through us.
China on Sunday mourned victims of the devastating landslide that occurred a week earlier in the northwest province of Gansu, killing at least 1,239 people and leaving more than 500 missing, state media reported.
Although Ala Abu Dheim's family in Jordan was forbidden by Jordan's government to erect a mourning tent or publicly mourn him with an open house, the Israeli government did not stop his immediate family from doing so in Jerusalem, saying there was no law against it.
For example, it was difficult to mourn without a body, yet paradoxically many of those who mourned shared that particular experience and became unified by it.
In her madness, however, Ophelia both curses and blesses the community (197) before uniting it again to mourn at her grave (194).
(Blackstrap, CPC, Opposition Critic for Status of Women, Families, and Caregivers): As we mourn the passing of one of our great moral leaders, we must also celebrate the life of Pope John Paul the Second.
Bagpipe Brothers: The FDNY Band's True Story Of Tragedy, Mourning, And Recovery is the true story New York City's Emerald Society Bagpipe Band, who used their instruments to mourn in the and show their respect at the funerals for the victims of the 9/11 attacks, including the 343 firefighters who died and those who were unearthed from the rubble at ground zero.
For with each loss that we mourn, we become more complex ourselves, incorporating the other into ourselves, increasing the possibility of recognition of the other both within ourselves and in each other.