charlatan

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Related to mountebanks: charlatanry, charlatanism

charlatan

 [shahr´lah-tan]
a pretender to knowledge or skills not possessed; in medicine, a quack.

char·la·tan

(shar'lă-tan),
A medical fraud claiming to cure disease by useless procedures, secret remedies, and worthless diagnostic and therapeutic machines.
Synonym(s): quack
[Fr., fr. It. ciarlare, to prattle]

charlatan

[shär′lətən]
Etymology: Fr, imposter
a totally unqualified individual posing as an expert, especially an individual pretending to be a physician. Also called quack. charlatanical, adj.
(1) Quack
(2) A pretentious imposter (in current non-medical use)

char·la·tan

(shahr'lă-tăn)
A medical fraud claiming to cure disease by useless procedures, secret remedies, and worthless diagnostic and therapeutic machines.
Synonym(s): quack.
[Fr., fr. It. ciarlare, to prattle]

charlatan

A person unjustifiably claiming knowledge or skill, especially of medicine or healing. In this age of pseudoscience, it is often difficult to distinguish the charlatan from the merely uninformed.

char·la·tan

(shahr'lă-tăn)
A medical imposter claiming to cure disease by useless procedures, secret remedies, and worthless diagnostic and therapeutic machines.
Synonym(s): quack.
[Fr., fr. It. ciarlare, to prattle]

charlatan

a pretender to knowledge or skills not possessed; in veterinary medicine, a quack.
References in periodicals archive ?
While we might have an idea that the streets of early modern London constituted a vibrant, thriving theatre, where on any given day, one would have encountered mini-dramas--the hawking of goods, the poor begging, the bargaining and haggling from shops spilling out into the streets, thieves working their trade, vagrants clustered in corners, carts, carriages, horses coursing through the streets, we may not have noticed the mountebanks.
For work on women as mountebanks, in addition to Bella Mirabella's "'Quacking Delilahs': Female Mountebanks in Early Modern England and Italy," Brown and Parolin, Women Players, 89-105, see M.
I don't argue with Krugman's judgment of the dissembling mountebanks, among them our secretaries of state and defense, busy cranking the handles of "destiny" and setting in motion "the march of events," but I'm reluctant to concede the phrases "perhaps irrevocably" and "never before seen in U.
I had in mind to incorporate this illusion into a lecture on the history of charlatans, having learned that at one time mountebanks performed the trick and then pretended to heal the cut on their arm with whatever wondrous nostrum they were selling.
All through the 1980s and '90s professorial mountebanks like James Q.
The huckster worked the carnivals, like the mountebanks of the old frontier towns who sold snake oil to cure all your ills.
They're nothing but a pack of social scientists, marketers, and mountebanks who don't even look at the game but analyze the arena for logo penetration and recognition.
They are actors, writers, artists, politicians, foreigners, mountebanks, explorers; in other words, they are outsiders, by profession or circumstance or temperament, engaged in some kind of search for authenticity, or at least a compensating frame of reference.
org) is a critic, playwright, and performer, and manager of Mountebanks, New York's retro-garde theater company (www.
Many of the Fellows disapproved of the published home remedies and self-help manuals proliferating in the capital, and the College, by virtue of its monopolistic charter, prosecuted unlicensed mountebanks and quacksalvers who extolled their personal nostrums throughout the city.
These were all marginal people - wanderers and mountebanks whose normal stock in trade was deformity, perversion, and sexual titillation.
Torchbearers were used in three other masques, as part of the processional entry: Huntingdon (1607), Queens (1609) and Mountebanks (1618).