charlatan

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Related to mountebanks: charlatanry, charlatanism

charlatan

 [shahr´lah-tan]
a pretender to knowledge or skills not possessed; in medicine, a quack.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

char·la·tan

(shar'lă-tan),
A medical fraud claiming to cure disease by useless procedures, secret remedies, and worthless diagnostic and therapeutic machines.
Synonym(s): quack
[Fr., fr. It. ciarlare, to prattle]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
(1) Quack
(2) A pretentious imposter (in current non-medical use)
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

char·la·tan

(shahr'lă-tăn)
A medical fraud claiming to cure disease by useless procedures, secret remedies, and worthless diagnostic and therapeutic machines.
Synonym(s): quack.
[Fr., fr. It. ciarlare, to prattle]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

charlatan

A person unjustifiably claiming knowledge or skill, especially of medicine or healing. In this age of pseudoscience, it is often difficult to distinguish the charlatan from the merely uninformed.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

char·la·tan

(shahr'lă-tăn)
A medical imposter claiming to cure disease by useless procedures, secret remedies, and worthless diagnostic and therapeutic machines.
Synonym(s): quack.
[Fr., fr. It. ciarlare, to prattle]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Wendell Willkie, the father asserted, had turned out to be a "mountebank."
Katritzky, Women, Medicine and Theatre, 1500-1750: Literary Mountebanks and Performing Quacks (Aldershot, 2007).
While the connections between Shakespeare's plays and commedia dell'arte have received much scholarly and critical attention, mountebanks have gone undetected.
(3.) For work on women as mountebanks, in addition to Bella Mirabella's "'Quacking Delilahs': Female Mountebanks in Early Modern England and Italy," Brown and Parolin, Women Players, 89-105, see M.
Pizzorno focuses on the Antimasque of Mountebanks (1618), in which Paradox appears on stage as a character.
Women, medicine, and theatre, 1550-1750; literary mountebanks and performing quacks.
Natasha Korda's essay is paired with one on women as mountebanks in Italy and England, players in a 'social drama' in which 'medicine becomes performance' (p.
A month later, Mailer gave a statement in court defending the novel's honest portrait of America's "own potential Hell" of "monsters, half-mad geniuses, cripples, mountebanks, criminals, perverts, and putrefying beasts."
Hostility to 'modern art' in the 20th century is energetically explained in a way that tends to discount other points of view: Duchamp and conceptual art are not to Spalding's taste, and in museums of contemporary art 'curators have created quasi-sacred spaces that exist without a religious belief to sustain them which are a sitting target for mountebanks and pseudoshamans'.
Part 2, "Beyond Elites," includes: Natasha Korda, "The Case of Moll Frith: Women's Work and the [All-Male Stage'" (71-88); and Bella Mirabella, "'Quacking Delilahs': Female Mountebanks in Early Modern England and Italy" (89-108).
Within seconds the space was ablaze with movement and local color, a street scene of chaotic hawkers and prating mountebanks, most prominently Dr.
etc.--who make lucrative authorial careers from blaming Nazism on Catholic "antisemitism"; but since such mountebanks' particular discipline is victimology rather than history, they need not detain cultural literates for longer than is needed to note their deplorable existence.)