charlatan

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charlatan

 [shahr´lah-tan]
a pretender to knowledge or skills not possessed; in medicine, a quack.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

char·la·tan

(shar'lă-tan),
A medical fraud claiming to cure disease by useless procedures, secret remedies, and worthless diagnostic and therapeutic machines.
Synonym(s): quack
[Fr., fr. It. ciarlare, to prattle]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
(1) Quack
(2) A pretentious imposter (in current non-medical use)
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

char·la·tan

(shahr'lă-tăn)
A medical fraud claiming to cure disease by useless procedures, secret remedies, and worthless diagnostic and therapeutic machines.
Synonym(s): quack.
[Fr., fr. It. ciarlare, to prattle]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

charlatan

A person unjustifiably claiming knowledge or skill, especially of medicine or healing. In this age of pseudoscience, it is often difficult to distinguish the charlatan from the merely uninformed.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

char·la·tan

(shahr'lă-tăn)
A medical imposter claiming to cure disease by useless procedures, secret remedies, and worthless diagnostic and therapeutic machines.
Synonym(s): quack.
[Fr., fr. It. ciarlare, to prattle]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the search for mountebanks should, like charity, begin at home.
Thus Jonson fuses these medieval notions in Volpone's impersonation of a mountebank.
While Crosswill tries to "purge" undesirables from the town, the play underscores that the "true" natives are the bawdy house owners and the itinerant mountebank. When Gabriel becomes "Captain" of the "Blade and the Battoon" with Nicholas as his lieutenant, Brome suggests the real-world implications of Gabriers resistance to the upper-class incursion in Covent Garden.
While we might have an idea that the streets of early modern London constituted a vibrant, thriving theatre, where on any given day, one would have encountered mini-dramas--the hawking of goods, the poor begging, the bargaining and haggling from shops spilling out into the streets, thieves working their trade, vagrants clustered in corners, carts, carriages, horses coursing through the streets, we may not have noticed the mountebanks. But as one wandered through this rumbling, intense world, one would have encountered other kinds of street theatre as well, mountebank performers, for example--English and foreign--up on makeshift stages enthralling the crowd and hawking homemade remedies.
To this picture, though, must be added the alternative stages and playing spaces--the masquing stage, the aristocratic house--that were indeed reputable and the stages, like the mountebank platform or the ballad seller's pitch, which were the product of economic necessity.
Boyer translates "El simulacro" as "The Sham', Hurley as "The Mountebank"--a somewhat archaic word meaning a huckster or con man.
But as the putative discoverer of a panacea for the chronic conceptual and empirical ailments he attributes to them, he cuts a less convincing figure, one reminiscent of a fairground mountebank, or perhaps the charlatan wizard Gilderoy Lockhart in Harry Potter and The Chamber of Secrets.
On March 24, 1932, Halpin mused in a column in the Globe that it was a mystery how anyone could be found "in this enlightened age" who would pay attention "to the ravings" of Maloney's "apparently deranged brain." Moreover, Halpin called Maloney, among other epithets, an "unscrupulous degenerate," "a demagogue," "a liar," "a mountebank," and a "slanderer" because of his insinuation "that Catholic nurses were out to murder Protestant patients" in Alberta hospitals.
He is directly responsible for every dollar that has been wasted, every piece of highfalutin rubbish that has been put upon the statute books, and for the operations of every mountebank on the public payroll, from the highest to the lowest.
For instance, no one but an idiot or a mountebank would suggest anything other than faithful replacement if an element of a great Classical composition were to be destroyed.
He had the look of a mountebank, but anyone who witnessed his performances saw a touch of genius.
Mercilessly, Tolstoy tears off the mountebank's mask revealing the man beneath.