mountain sickness


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Related to mountain sickness: chronic mountain sickness

altitude sickness

 [al´tĭ-tūd]
a syndrome caused by exposure to altitude high enough to cause significant hypoxia (lack of oxygen). At high altitudes the atmospheric pressure, and thus arterial oxygen content, are decreased. Called also high-altitude sickness and mountain sickness.

Acute altitude sickness may occur after a few hours' exposure to a high altitude. Mental functions may be affected; there may be lightheadedness and breathlessness; and eventually headache and prostration may occur. Older persons and those with pulmonary or cardiovascular disease are most susceptible. After a few hours or days of acclimation the symptoms will subside.

Chronic altitude sickness (called also Monge's disease and Andes disease) occurs in those living in the high Andes above 15,000 feet. It resembles polycythemia, but is completely relieved if the patient is moved to sea level.

al·ti·tude sick·ness

a syndrome caused by low inspired oxygen pressure (as at high altitude) and characterized by nausea, headache, dyspnea, malaise, and insomnia; in severe instances, pulmonary edema and adult respiratory distress syndrome can occur; Synonym(s): Acosta disease, mountain sickness, puna, soroche

mountain sickness

n.
Altitude sickness brought on by the diminished oxygen pressure at mountain elevations.
A syndrome affecting those living for various periods at high altitudes, which is diagnosed if a person has 3+ major symptoms: anorexia, dyspnoea, fatigue, headache, insomnia, which generally responds to dexamethasone. Mountain sickness is divided into acute and chronic forms

mountain sickness

Acute MS, altitude anoxia, altitude sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, high altitude pulmonary edema Wilderness medicine A syndrome affecting those living for various periods at high altitudes, which is diagnosed if a person has 3+ major symptoms: anorexia, dyspnea, fatigue, headache, insomnia, which respond to dexamethasone; MS is divided into acute and chronic forms. See High-altitude pulmonary edema, Höhendiurese.

al·ti·tude sick·ness

(al'ti-tūd sik'nĕs)
A syndrome caused by low inspired oxygen pressure (as at high altitude) and characterized by nausea, headache, dyspnea, malaise, and insomnia; in severe instances, pulmonary edema and adult respiratory distress syndrome can occur.
Synonym(s): Acosta disease, aerial sickness, mountain sickness.

mountain sickness

A syndrome caused by reduced oxygen tension in the atmosphere at heights above about 3000 m, especially in people who proceed too quickly to high altitudes. There is deep breathing, a rapid pulse, loss of appetite, greatly reduced capacity for physical or mental work, headache, nausea, weakness, dizziness and insomnia. The vision may be affected by retinal bleeding. The chief danger is from fluid in the lungs (PULMONARY OEDEMA) and brain swelling (cerebral oedema). Either may be fatal unless rapidly corrected by administration of oxygen or an immediate descent to a lower altitude. DIURETIC drugs and DEXAMETHASONE can help to reduce oedema.

mountain sickness

fatigue, headache and nausea in humans resulting from the lack of oxygen above about 4000 m.
References in periodicals archive ?
Determinants of summiting success and acute mountain sickness on Mt Kilimanjaro (5895 m).
Acute mountain sickness is not repeatable across two 12-hour normobaric hypoxia exposures.
Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is by far the most common high altitude illness (HAI).
Li X, Tao F, Pei T, You H, Liu Y, Gao Y (2011) Population level determinants of acute mountain sickness among young men: a retrospective study.
Lassen et al., "Cerebral blood flow in acute mountain sickness," Journal of Applied Physiology, vol.
Smoking status is thought to participate in acute mountain sickness, and it is considered a traditional risk factor for the development of AMS [1,11].
Awareness, prevalence, medication use and risk factors of acute mountain sickness in tourists trekking around the Annapurnas in Nepal: A 12 year follow-up.
Resting Arterial Oxygen Saturation for the Prediction of subsequent Development ofAcute Mountain Sickness. Med Sport 2014; 18(3): 112.
The challenges experienced during a trip at such high altitudes, including Acute Mountain Sickness and unpredictable road conditions, enhance the storyline.
* If you've experienced mountain sickness before or have anemia, ask your doctor for medication.