mold

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mold

 [mōld]
any of a group of parasitic and saprobic fungi causing a cottony growth on organic substances; also, the deposit of growth produced by such fungi.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mold

(mōld),
1. A filamentous fungus, generally appearing as a circular colony that may be cottony, wooly, or glabrous, but with filaments that are not organized into large fruiting bodies, such as mushrooms.
2. A shaped receptacle into which wax is pressed or fluid plaster is poured in making a cast.
3. To shape a mass of plastic material according to a definite pattern.
4. To change in shape; denoting especially the adaptation of the fetal head to the pelvic canal.
5. The term used to specify the shape of an artificial tooth (or teeth).
Synonym(s): mould
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
A descriptor for a smooth contour of the small intestinal mucosa with loss of mucosal folds, typical of radiocontrast studies in gluten-sensitive enteropathy (coeliac disease)
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mold

Vox populi A form that provides shape for a gel or substance–eg, a resin set in a particular shape
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mold

(mōld)
1. A filamentous fungus, generally a circular colony that may be cottony, wooly, or glabrous, but with filaments not organized into large fruiting bodies, such as mushrooms.
2. A shaped receptacle into which wax is pressed or fluid plaster is poured in making a cast.
3. To shape a mass of plastic material according to a definite pattern.
4. To change in shape; denoting especially the adaptation of the fetal head to the pelvic canal.
5. The term used to specify the shape of an artificial tooth (or teeth).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mold

(mōld)
1. A shaped receptacle into which wax is pressed or fluid plaster is poured in making a cast.
2. To shape a mass of plastic material according to a definite pattern.
3. The term used to specify the shape of an artificial tooth (or teeth).
Synonym(s): mould.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
detritus, Jan found including registration and the is carpet for with the three-day to Manchester Airport to the tip, says land in her bank Bosses at Manchester said offered sent M.In said time has the "We are investigation regard to what has It was mostly fast food rubbish; there was mouldy food, stale milk, it was disgusting Van owner Jan, 40
When the viewing public discovered that Mouldy Old Dough was available as a single, they bought enough copies to secure the No.1 slot in the Belgian charts.
A council spokesman said: "He was unaware that there was mouldy and out-of-date food, and food at risk of cross contamination due to poor storage of raw and cooked meat in the chiller."
You've got things back to front because mouldy, green, rancid food is the best.
At a similar store just a few days earlier, I stood with a dozen other people sorting through piles of apples, each of us hoping to find at least a few that weren't mouldy, badly bruised or obviously past their best.
A soft cheese or cottage cheese won't last as long as a hard cheese like Cheddar that tends to go slowly mouldy over time.
Sorbic Acid will also keep bread fresh for seven days, lengthening the shelf life and therefore reducing the amount of mouldy bread being returned.
A SCOTS couple received a breadmaker as a wedding gift and opened it to find a mouldy loaf inside.
It is like new bread: it soon becomes stale, then mouldy, and finally crumbles to dust.
But, whereas Frye's journey round the `mouldy' motifs which are conventionalized in Shakespeare's plays led him back to relationships between drama, myth, and ritual and forwards into the structural patterning in opera, in music, in modernist art (like The Waste Land), and in popular culture (`the detective story, the thriller, the Western, the adventure story, the science fiction', etc.), Scragg takes us back (through Geoffrey Bullough) into Shakespeare's sources, before moving forward into the twentieth-century theatrical imagination (`It's not Shakespeare's mouldy tale that haunts the corridors of the modern mind - but Lawrence Olivier's', p.
A Tesco customer felt "physically sick" after finding a mouldy tin of rice pudding in a Gateshead store.
A mother has spoken of her horror as she almost fed her children mouldy naan bread after receiving it in herAsda food delivery.