mottled


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mottled

(mot′ĕld)
Blotchy or marbled in appearance. It is often used to describe the skin of patients who are cold or inadequately perfused, e.g., in shock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to test for differences in mean TL among fish that moved upstream >1 m, downstream >1 m, or moved <1 m, and to test for differences in mean mottled sculpin TL among stream segments.
The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) followed suit, banding mottled ducks in 1997.
Deliberately setting vessels in contact with firewood (especially resinous pine) or allowing the intense heat of embers resting against the vessels to burn away the oxygen are perhaps the simplest techniques which might have been used to create a mottled effect.
As mottled enamel is the result of partial failure of ameloblasts to properly elaborate and lay down enamel, it is a developmental injury.
A popular look is a mottled figure that runs on a bias," Barrett said.
The 2ft long female mottled brown shark was kept in an aquarium in a brick shed in the garden and was taken on July 26.
The resultant seeds were a mottled olive-green in colour, very pretty to look at, but hardly resembling the beans I had planted.
He can only hope that some viewer sees in its mottled topography the face of a deity or deceased entertainer.
A single, blinded observer visually classified day 21 [A.sup.vy]/a offspring coat-color phenotype into one of five categories based on proportion of brown to yellow in the fur: yellow (< 5% brown), slightly mottled (between 5% and 50% brown), mottled (~ 50% brown), heavily mottled (between 50% and 95% brown), and pseudoagouti (> 95% brown).
The seeds exhibited two distinct types of seed coat color, one white to light gray with black markings (mottled), and the other a solid light brown without markings (uniformly colored).
Greatly enlarged--the largest work here was nearly ten feet wide--the postcards develop a mottled grain, a screenlike barrier precluding total immersion in the view.