motor recovery


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motor recovery

Improvement in the performance of a fatigued muscle or in the movement of a group of muscles paralyzed by stroke or injury.
See also: recovery
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Recovery rate was accelerated, and their final level of motor recovery was increased as assessed by the Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale.
Motor recovery in these individuals is similar to that in individuals with complete neurological injury.
The power of virtual reality and video game-based therapies has shown promise in augmenting motor recovery [59-61].
Malouin F, Pichard L, Bonneau C, Durand A and Corriveau D (1994): Evaluating motor recovery early after stroke: comparison of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and the Motor Assessment Scale.
This confirms the doubts expressed by several researchers about the validity of the "plateau" of recovery after which chronic patients apparently do not gain significant motor recovery [21-22,26,35-38].
Butler AJ and Page SJ (2008): Mental practice with motor imagery: evidence for motor recovery and cortical reorganization after stroke.
Therefore, the main objective of this article was to systematically analyze the literature to find evidence regarding the effectiveness of RT compared with CT in improving motor recovery and functional abilities of the paretic UL of patients with stroke.
Motor recovery was measured using the Brunnstrom stages, spasticity by the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and activity by the self care items of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM).
The long-term data from PROSPECT and EVEREST further confirms the safety profile of the Renova[TM] Cortical Stimulation System* and continues to provide researchers new insight into the potential of cortical stimulation for depression and stroke motor recovery," said John Bowers, Northstar's President and Chief Executive Officer.
The analysis of the great toe during motor recovery is important from a clinical point of view since it has consequences on locomotion; the role of the great toe on the motor recovery of poststroke patients (PSs) has recently been investigated [7].
Duncan PW (1997): Synthesis of Intervention Trials To Improve Motor Recovery following Stroke.
The NESS H200 is an advanced hand rehabilitation system designed to use mild Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) to improve hand function and promote motor recovery in some patients who have lost function of their upper extremity following injury to the central nervous system, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury.