motor programme

motor programme

a prestructured set of commands stored in memory that, once initiated, organizes and controls a specific action or sequence of actions in an open-loop fashion without subsequent modification. generalized motor programme a motor programme for a class of similar actions that can be selected and modified according to the parameters (e.g. speed, direction) required for successful execution of a specific action from that class. For example, a generalized motor programme for jumping can be modified according to the distance, height, direction, etc. of a particular jump.
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The presenters will be offered new deals to add work on their last two films for the motor programme.
The D-level, with realizable motor programme, firmly embedded in reality, with "flexible" events that have to be adjusted to it, may indirectly control even a very complex motor operation.
The former manages the real motor programmes embedded in "stiff" time-space continuum, whereas the latter deals with fantastic, often not realizable representations of motor performances enveloped in "flexible" time-space continuum.
The motor programme was viewed as 'a set of muscle commands that are structured before a movement sequence begins, and that allows the entire sequence to be carried out' (Keele, 1968).
Two main classes of data supported the motor programme construct.
Thus, at A-level the internal pattern of such feedforward chunk is reflex arch; at B-level--routine; at C-level--schema (as by Schmidt); at D-level--specific motor programme; and at E-level--generalized motor programme [W.
For this re-invention of the formerly renowned motor programme is wallpaper telly at its worst.
If the element matches the desired movement, the motor programme can then be passed on for execution.
She has told bosses of BBC motor programme Top Gear she's a founder member of NUDE - Naked Uninhibited Drivers Extraordinaire.
Bishop & Robson (1989) observed the phonological similarity effect and the word-length effect in children with no articulate speech from birth and it is difficult to accept that such children have developed an adequate speech motor programme without ever having produced overt speech.
The support given by this group of staff is highly valued and the need for appropriate training to deliver motor programmes as well as understanding the needs of the child with specific learning difficulties is essential if success is to be achieved.