motor learning

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mo·tor learn·ing

(mō'tŏr lĕrn'ing)
1. The process of acquiring a skill by which the learner, through practice and assimilation, refines and makes automatic the desired movement.
2. An internal neurologic process that results in the ability to produce a new motor task.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

motor learning

Any of the processes related to the acquisition and retention of skills associated with movement. They are influenced by practice, experience, and memory.
See also: learning
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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References in periodicals archive ?
Karni, "Daytime sleep condenses the time course of motor memory consolidation," Nature Neuroscience, vol.
Doyon, "Transient synchronization of hippocampostriato-thalamo-cortical networks during sleep spindle oscillations induces motor memory consolidation," NeuroImage, vol.
Richmond, "Effect of sleep on gross motor memory," Memory, vol.
What does this simplified description of motor memory mean in practical terms?
This approach will assist the brain in constructing the specific engrams in its motor memory for successful recall.
Duque et al., "Formation of a motor memory by action observation," The Journal of Neuroscience, vol.
Cohen, "Encoding a motor memory in the older adult by action observation," NeuroImage, vol.
In short, if your brain can rely on your short-term motor memory to handle memorizing a single motor task, then it will do so, failing to engage your long-term memory in the process.
Game situations offer the best way to develop motor memory. Proper (specifically designed) practice will reduce uncertainty in situations involving unfamiliar stimuli or extremely complex tasks.
When you learn to ride a bicycle, once the motor memory is formed, you don't forget.