motor learning


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mo·tor learn·ing

(mō'tŏr lĕrn'ing)
1. The process of acquiring a skill by which the learner, through practice and assimilation, refines and makes automatic the desired movement.
2. An internal neurologic process that results in the ability to produce a new motor task.

motor learning

Any of the processes related to the acquisition and retention of skills associated with movement. They are influenced by practice, experience, and memory.
See also: learning
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(4.) Gabriele Wulf and Rebecca Lewthwaite, "Optimizing Performance Through Intrinisic Motivation and Attention for Learning: The OPTIMAL Theory of Motor Learning," Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 23, no.
Practice as an intervention to improve speeded motor performance and motor learning in Parkinson's disease.
Evidence has shown that variable practice induces the ability to adapt and the generalization of motor learning to a greater degree than constant force practice does [31].
Miall, "The resting human brain and motor learning," Current Biology, vol.
The effect of sleep loss on motor learning has been studied in healthy subjects using experimentally induced sleep deprivation.
This review summarizes the results of studies that seek answers to the questions: What are the plastic changes seen in the primary motor cortex during motor learning process?
Attentional focus and motor learning: a review of 15 years.
However, two major epochs characterized research in the area of motor learning, one prior to the 1970s, where they aimed to verify which factors affected the acquisition of motor skills, such as practice in whole or in part, to mass or distributed practice, type of feedback, instruction among others, these researches used complex tasks such as sports skills.
Swinnen, "Motor learning in Parkinson's disease: limitations and potential for rehabilitation," Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, vol.
[26.] Boyce BA, Coker CA, Bunker LK (2006) Implications for variability of practice from pedagogy and motor learning perspectives: finding a common ground.
Movements in rehabilitation should also be self-initiated for better motor learning (Lotze et al.