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motor

 [mo´ter]
1. pertaining to motion.
2. a muscle, nerve, or center that effects movements.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mo·tor

(mō'ter),
1. In anatomy and physiology, denoting neural structures, that because of the impulses generated and transmitted by them, cause muscle fibers or pigment cells to contract or glands to secrete.
See also: motor cortex, motor endplate, motor neuron.
2. In psychology, denoting the organism's overt reaction to a stimulus (motor response).
[L. a mover, fr. moveo, to move]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

motor

(mō′tər)
adj.
1. Causing or producing motion.
2. Relating to or being nerves that carry impulses from the nerve centers to the muscles.
3. Involving or relating to movements of the muscles.
4. Relating to an organism's overt reaction to a stimulus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

aphasia

Dysphasia Neurology Partial or total inability to understand or create speech, writing, or language due to damage to the brain's speech centers; loss of a previously possessed facility of language comprehension or production unexplained by sensory or motor defects or diffuse cerebral dysfunction Etiology Stroke, brain disease, injury; anomia–nominal or amnesic aphasia and impaired ability to communicate by writing-agraphia are usually present in all forms of aphasia. See Broca's/Motor aphasia, Sensory/Wernicke's aphasia, Tactile aphasia.
Aphasia
Motor
Broca's aphasiaA primary deficit in language output or speech production, which ranges in severity from the mildest, cortical dysarthria, characterized by intact comprehension and ability to write, to a complete inability to communicate by lingual, phonetic, or manual activity
Sensory
Wernicke's aphasiaPts with sensory aphasia are voluble, gesticulate, and totally unaware of the total incoherency of their speech patterns; the words are nonsubstantive, malformed, inappropriate–paraphasia Sensory aphasia is characterized by 2 elements: Impaired speech comprehension–due largely to an inability to differentiate spoken and written phonemes–word elements-due to either involvement of the auditory association areas or separation from the 1º auditory complex Fluently articulated but paraphasic speech, which confirms the major role played by the auditory region in regulating language
Total
Global aphasia, complete aphasiaA form of aphasia caused by lesions that destroy significant amounts of brain tissue, eg occlusion of the middle cerebral or left internal carotid arteries, or tumors, hemorrhage, or other lesions; total aphasia is characterized by virtually complete impairment of speech and recognition thereof; afflicted Pts cannot read, write, or repeat what is said to them; although they may understand simple words or phrases, rapid fatigue and verbal and motor perseverence, they fail to carry out simple commands; total aphasia of vascular origin is almost invariably accompanied by right hemiplegia, hemianesthesia, hemianopia of varying intensity
.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mo·tor

(mō'tŏr)
1. anatomy, physiology Denoting those neural structures that, by the impulses generated and transmitted by them, cause muscle fibers or pigment cells to contract, or glands to secrete.
See also: motor cortex, motor endplate, motor neuron
2. psychology Denoting the overt reaction of an organism to a stimulus (motor response).
3. Pertaining to a set of skills involving movement or motion.
[L. a mover, fr. moveo, to move]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

motor

1. Causing movement.
2. Carrying nerve impulses that stimulate muscles into contraction or cause other responses such as gland secretion. From the Latin movere , to move.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

motor

relating to the stimulus of an EFFECTOR organ.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Motor

Of or pertaining to motion, the body apparatus involved in movement, or the brain functions that direct purposeful activity.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mo·tor

(mō'tŏr)
In anatomy and physiology, denoting those neural structures that, because of the impulses generated and transmitted by them, cause muscle fibers or pigment cells to contract or glands to secrete.
[L. a mover, fr. moveo, to move]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This could be equivalent to the motor dysfunction in MHE patients, which include subclinical motor slowing, impaired visual perception, impaired visuo-constructive ability, mild cognitive impairment, impaired ability to do memory tasks due to attention deficit, impaired performance in recognition tasks, and altered working memory (3).
In this study, it does seem likely that poor nutrition was secondary to motor dysfunction, since most of the malnourished patients were non-ambulatory with severe GMD.
(19) described oral motor dysfunction in up to 90% of persons with cerebral palsy.
Notably, the odds of persistent motor dysfunction were about 15 times higher when patients presented with acute flaccid paralysis or pulmonary edema than when they had other syndromes (OR, 15; 95% CI, 3-79; P less than .001).
The 7 PD patients (5 male, 2 female) with scores less than 35 were assigned to the low motor dysfunction (LMD) group, and the 12 PD patients (6 male, 6 female) with scores equal to or greater than 35 were assigned to the high motor dysfunction (HMD) group.
Epidemiological studies suggest that nonmotor symptoms such as hyposmia (poor sense of smell), chronic constipation, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (in which sufferers appear to act out dreams in their sleep), daytime sleepiness, anxiety, and depression may occur before the appearance of motor dysfunction in PD patients.
Improvement of chronic poststroke motor dysfunction can be facilitated by special training [1,2], medication [3,4], and multisensory stimulation methods (for review, see [5,6]).
Neurologists, psychiatrists, and a rehabilitation specialist from the US cover evaluation, clinical and functional imaging, delirium, traumatic brain injury, seizure disorders, cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system, dementias associated with motor dysfunction, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, psychopharmacological treatments, and cognitive rehabilitation and behavior therapy.
Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to determine the correlation between severity of motor dysfunction (UPDRS motor scores), the PFTs parameters and fatigue.
Underlying themes of the book are the need for improved research designs and improved clinical management of acute and chronic pain, post traumatic stress disorder, sensory dysfunction and psychological distress and motor dysfunction. The authors contend that WAD is a unique condition which warrants specific assessment and management.
Researchers also demonstrated that transplantation of these cells increased the survival rate in the mouse model of ALS and significantly delayed the progress of motor dysfunction.