motor cortex


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Related to motor cortex: sensory cortex, supplementary motor cortex

mo·tor cor·tex

the region of the cerebral cortex most nearly immediately influencing movements of the face, neck and trunk, and upper and lower extremities; it corresponds approximately to Brodmann areas 4 and 6 of the precentral gyrus and anterior paracentral gyrus, and immediately adjacent portions of the superior and middle frontal gyri; its effects on the motor neurons innervating the skeletal musculature are mediated by corticospinal fibers (pyramidal tract) and corticonuclear fibers and are particularly essential for the human capacity to perform finely graded movements of the extremities, especially the upper.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mo·tor cor·tex

(mō'tŏr kōr'teks)
The region of the cerebral cortex most immediately influencing movements of the face, neck, trunk, arms, and legs; its effects on the motor neurons innervating the skeletal musculature are mediated by the pyramidal tract.
Synonym(s): excitable area, motor area, Rolando area.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

motor cortex

The part of the surface layer of each hemisphere of the main brain (cerebrum) in which voluntary movement is initiated. These areas can be mapped out to show which parts of them are responsible for movement of any particular parts of the body. The map resembles a distorted and inverted human figure.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

motor cortex

the part of the cerebral cortex of the brain that controls the motor functions.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Rolando,

Luigi, Italian anatomist, 1773-1831.
fissure of Rolando - a double S-shaped fissure extending obliquely upward and backward on the lateral surface of each cerebral hemisphere at the boundary between frontal and parietal lobes. Synonym(s): central sulcus
rolandic epilepsy - a benign autosomal dominant form of epilepsy occurring in children.
Rolando angle - the angle at which the fissure of Rolando meets with the midplane.
Rolando area - the region of the cerebral cortex most immediately influencing movements of the face, neck and trunk, arm, and leg. Synonym(s): motor cortex
Rolando cells - the nerve cells in Rolando gelatinous substance of the spinal cord.
Rolando column - a slight ridge on either side of the medulla oblongata related to the descending trigeminal tract and nucleus.
Rolando gelatinous substance - the apical part of the posterior horn of the spinal cord's gray matter, composed largely of very small nerve cells. Synonym(s): gelatinous substance
Rolando tubercle - a longitudinal prominence on the dorsolateral surface of the medulla oblongata along the lateral border of the tuberculum cuneatum. Synonym(s): tuberculum cinereum
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012

cortex, motor 

Area of the frontal lobe of the brain just anterior to the central sulcus which is responsible for voluntary movements of the eyes (as well as other voluntary movements of other parts of the body). The motor cortex in each hemisphere controls mainly muscles on the opposite side of the body. It is laid out according to the parts of the body, with the region controlling the feet at the top and the region controlling the legs, the trunk, the arms and the head in descending order.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
1: M1 - primary motor cortex, LO - lateral orbital cortex, and VO - ventral orbital cortex.
MNI coordinates of the center of the spherical ROIs that were used in task-based fMRI comparisons Region MNI coordinates (x, y, z) Left primary motor cortex -42, -16, 52 Right primary motor cortex 39, -22, 52 Left supplementary motor area -9, -16, 67 Right supplementary motor area 12, -16, 67 Left thalamus -12, -19, 4 Right thalamus 12, -19, 4 Left putamen -21, 8, -5 Right putamen 24, 8, -5 Left caudate -15, 14, 10 Right caudate 15, 14, 10 Left globus pallidus -15, -4, -5 Right globus pallidus 18, -4, -5 MNI, Montreal Neurological Institute; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging.
This study implemented a computational model of motor control based on the DSH of neural coding mechanism in motor cortex. The motor generation was achieved through a spatiotemporal transformation mechanism with a dynamical controller.
More specifically, the electrodes were placed so that the first and the second (numbered 0 and 1 in Figure 2) lie on the motor cortex over the precentral gyrus, and the third and the fourth (numbered 2 and 3) lie on the somatosensory cortex over the postcentral gyrus and in the proximity of postcentral sulcus, respectively (Figure 2).
Ziemann, "The contribution of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the functional evaluation of microcircuits in human motor cortex," Frontiers in Neural Circuits, vol.
It has been demonstrated in rats and mice that during motor skill learning, reorganization and expansion occurs in the related motor cortex region where movement is represented in the primary motor cortex and an increased complexification and cortical synaptogenesis develop in the dendritic spines of the pyramidal neurons (24).
The researchers found the tendency for "catching" a yawn was associated with the levels of brain activity in a person's motor cortex. If there is more activity in the area, the person will be more inclined to yawn.
Long-latency afferent inhibition is probably related to the cortical-cortical connections involving the motor cortex and both primary and secondary somatosensory cortical areas [61].
As movements of the right side of the body are mainly controlled by the left motor cortex of the brain and bilateral connection of upper limb movement [17, 18], the increase of EEG power, sample entropy, and fractal dimension in both left and right motor cortices can be easily expected.
Pagni et al., "Results by motor cortex stimulation in treatment of focal dystonia, parkinson's disease and post-ictal spasticity.
* by modulating neural function: [5-8] TENS, spinal cord stimulation (SCS), motor cortex stimulation (MCS), and DBS
Its working principal is based upon its Electrodes within the stentrode, which pick up neural frequencies from the motor cortex and decode into voluntary commands for assistive devices like the exoskeleton.