motor area


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area

 [a´re-ah] (pl. a´reae, areas) (L.)
a limited space or plane surface.
acoustic a's auditory areas.
association a's areas of the cerebral cortex (excluding primary areas) connected with each other and with the neothalamus; they are responsible for higher mental and emotional processes, including memory, learning, speech, and the interpretation of sensations.
Area. Functional areas and lobes of the cerebrum.
auditory a's two contiguous areas of the temporal lobe in the region of the anterior transverse temporal gyrus, known as the primary and secondary auditory areas. Called also acoustic areas.
Broca's motor speech area an area comprising parts of the opercular and triangular portions of the inferior frontal gyrus; injury to this area may result in motor aphasia.
Broca's parolfactory area a small area of cortex on the medial surface of each cerebral hemisphere, between the anterior and posterior parolfactory sulci. Called also area subcallosa.
Brodmann's a's specific occipital and preoccipital areas of the cerebral cortex, distinguished by differences in the arrangement of their six cellular layers, and identified by numbering each area. They are considered to be the seat of specific functions of the brain.
catchment area
1. the geographical region drained by one body of water.
2. the area whose residents are served by a specialized health care agency. Called also catchment.
contact area proximal surface.
embryonic area (germinal area) (area germinati´va) embryonic disk.
Kiesselbach's area an area on the anterior part of the nasal septum, richly supplied with capillaries, and a common site of epistaxis (nosebleed).
language area any nerve center of the cerebral cortex, usually in the dominant hemisphere, controlling the understanding or use of language.
motor area any area of the cerebral cortex primarily involved in stimulating muscle contractions; most are in the precentral gyri. See also premotor area, sensorimotor area, and Broca's motor speech area.
motor speech area see Broca's motor speech area and Wernicke's area.
occupational performance a's categories of activities that make up an individual's occupational performance; they include activities of daily living, work activities, and play or leisure activities. A delay in any of these areas may be addressed by occupational therapy intervention.
olfactory area
1. a general area of the brain, including the olfactory bulb, tract, and trigone, the anterior portion of the gyrus cinguli, and the uncus.
postcentral area (postrolandic area) an area just posterior to the central sulcus of the cerebral hemisphere that is the primary receiving area for general sensations.
precentral area primary somatomotor area.
premotor area an area of the motor cortex of the frontal lobe immediately in front of the precentral gyrus.
primary area areas of the cerebral cortex comprising the motor and sensory regions.
primary receiving a's the areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the thalamic projections of the primary sensory modalities such as vision, hearing, and smell. Called also sensory areas.
primary somatomotor area an area in the posterior part of the frontal lobe just anterior to the central sulcus; different regions control motor activity of specific parts of the body. Called also precentral area and rolandic area.
projection a's those areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the most direct projection of the sensory systems of the body.
sensorimotor area the cortex of the precentral and postcentral gyri, which are the motor area and the primary receiving area for general sensations, respectively.
sensory a's primary receiving areas.
sensory association area an association area around the borders of a primary receiving area, where sensory stimuli are interpreted.
silent area an area of the brain in which pathologic conditions may occur without producing symptoms.
somatic sensory area (somatosensory area) either of two cortical projection areas in or near the postcentral gyrus where conscious perception of somatic sensations occurs, known as the first or primary somatosensory area and the second or secondary somatosensory area.
area subcallo´sa (subcallosal area) Broca's parolfactory area.
area under the curve (AUC) the area enclosed between the curve of a probability with nonnegative values and the axis of the quality being measured; of the total area under a curve, the proportion that falls between two given points on the curve defines a probability density function.
visual a's three areas (first, second, and third visual areas) of the visual cortex. The first visual area is better known as the striate cortex.
vocal area rima glottidis.
Wernicke's area originally a name for a speech center thought to be confined to the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus next to the transverse temporal gyri; the term now refers to a wider zone that also includes the supramarginal and angular gyri.

mo·tor cor·tex

the region of the cerebral cortex most nearly immediately influencing movements of the face, neck and trunk, and upper and lower extremities; it corresponds approximately to Brodmann areas 4 and 6 of the precentral gyrus and anterior paracentral gyrus, and immediately adjacent portions of the superior and middle frontal gyri; its effects on the motor neurons innervating the skeletal musculature are mediated by corticospinal fibers (pyramidal tract) and corticonuclear fibers and are particularly essential for the human capacity to perform finely graded movements of the extremities, especially the upper.

mo·tor cor·tex

(mō'tŏr kōr'teks)
The region of the cerebral cortex most immediately influencing movements of the face, neck, trunk, arms, and legs; its effects on the motor neurons innervating the skeletal musculature are mediated by the pyramidal tract.
Synonym(s): excitable area, motor area, Rolando area.
References in periodicals archive ?
In consonance, study about the brain activation and connections that occurs during motor imagery indicates that the primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area and prefrontal cortex plays a crucial role during the MI and ME.
Treatment-related changes in resting-state connectivity have been shown following motor recovery in motor areas [53] and following aphasia treatment in both the default mode [54] and language [55] networks.
Machado et al., "Stimulation targeting higher motor areas in stroke rehabilitation: a proof-of-concept, randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled study of effectiveness and underlying mechanisms," Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, vol.
Gilson, "Localization in somatic sensory and motor areas of human cerebral cortex as determined by direct recording of evoked potentials and electrical stimulation.," Journal of Neurosurgery, vol.
middle cingulate cortex -2.20 [+ or -] 4.20 * p < 0.05 (paired f-test comparing rCBF in high to low urgency state within each group); ^ p < 0.05 (nonparametric f-test comparing change in rCBF in overactive bladder and control groups); ACC: anterior cingulate cortex, DL PFC: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; SMA: supplementary motor area; R: right, L: left.
Cortical stimulation mapping was performed to localize the motor area. An Ojemann Cortical Stimulator (Integra LifeSciences) was used, with 1-mm electrode tips 5 mm, delivering 60 Hz / 1 msec biphasic square wave pulses, with progressive increase of stimulation intensity from 2 mA to a maximal 10 mA.
The scans identified two adjacent brain areas that seem to respond to familiar songs: the caudal anterior cingulate and the ventral pre-supplementary motor area.
Hurled rocks A former national police chief, who is now an aide of Khaleda, was also injured as the mob hurled rocks at the convoy in central Dhaka's Bangla Motor area, the station said.
Additionally, there's a small gym or "gross motor area," with padded walls for safety and high clerestory windows, where children can exercise with therapists and learn to play in healthy ways.
In addition, the supplementary motor area is more involved in internally generated planning of movement, the planning of sequences of movement, and the co-ordination of the two sides of the body, such as in bimanual co-ordination movements.
Adding navigation to TMS is the key to finding the exact location and orientation of the e-field of the motor area that should be inhibited by stimulation.
Weakness of the facial and oral motor area: Open slack jaw posture and poor control of oral secretions.