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motor

 [mo´ter]
1. pertaining to motion.
2. a muscle, nerve, or center that effects movements.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mo·tor

(mō'ter),
1. In anatomy and physiology, denoting neural structures, that because of the impulses generated and transmitted by them, cause muscle fibers or pigment cells to contract or glands to secrete.
See also: motor cortex, motor endplate, motor neuron.
2. In psychology, denoting the organism's overt reaction to a stimulus (motor response).
[L. a mover, fr. moveo, to move]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

motor

(mō′tər)
adj.
1. Causing or producing motion.
2. Relating to or being nerves that carry impulses from the nerve centers to the muscles.
3. Involving or relating to movements of the muscles.
4. Relating to an organism's overt reaction to a stimulus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

aphasia

Dysphasia Neurology Partial or total inability to understand or create speech, writing, or language due to damage to the brain's speech centers; loss of a previously possessed facility of language comprehension or production unexplained by sensory or motor defects or diffuse cerebral dysfunction Etiology Stroke, brain disease, injury; anomia–nominal or amnesic aphasia and impaired ability to communicate by writing-agraphia are usually present in all forms of aphasia. See Broca's/Motor aphasia, Sensory/Wernicke's aphasia, Tactile aphasia.
Aphasia
Motor
Broca's aphasiaA primary deficit in language output or speech production, which ranges in severity from the mildest, cortical dysarthria, characterized by intact comprehension and ability to write, to a complete inability to communicate by lingual, phonetic, or manual activity
Sensory
Wernicke's aphasiaPts with sensory aphasia are voluble, gesticulate, and totally unaware of the total incoherency of their speech patterns; the words are nonsubstantive, malformed, inappropriate–paraphasia Sensory aphasia is characterized by 2 elements: Impaired speech comprehension–due largely to an inability to differentiate spoken and written phonemes–word elements-due to either involvement of the auditory association areas or separation from the 1º auditory complex Fluently articulated but paraphasic speech, which confirms the major role played by the auditory region in regulating language
Total
Global aphasia, complete aphasiaA form of aphasia caused by lesions that destroy significant amounts of brain tissue, eg occlusion of the middle cerebral or left internal carotid arteries, or tumors, hemorrhage, or other lesions; total aphasia is characterized by virtually complete impairment of speech and recognition thereof; afflicted Pts cannot read, write, or repeat what is said to them; although they may understand simple words or phrases, rapid fatigue and verbal and motor perseverence, they fail to carry out simple commands; total aphasia of vascular origin is almost invariably accompanied by right hemiplegia, hemianesthesia, hemianopia of varying intensity
.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mo·tor

(mō'tŏr)
1. anatomy, physiology Denoting those neural structures that, by the impulses generated and transmitted by them, cause muscle fibers or pigment cells to contract, or glands to secrete.
See also: motor cortex, motor endplate, motor neuron
2. psychology Denoting the overt reaction of an organism to a stimulus (motor response).
3. Pertaining to a set of skills involving movement or motion.
[L. a mover, fr. moveo, to move]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

motor

1. Causing movement.
2. Carrying nerve impulses that stimulate muscles into contraction or cause other responses such as gland secretion. From the Latin movere , to move.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

motor

relating to the stimulus of an EFFECTOR organ.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Motor

Of or pertaining to motion, the body apparatus involved in movement, or the brain functions that direct purposeful activity.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mo·tor

(mō'tŏr)
In anatomy and physiology, denoting those neural structures that, because of the impulses generated and transmitted by them, cause muscle fibers or pigment cells to contract or glands to secrete.
[L. a mover, fr. moveo, to move]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Efects of Voluntary and Forced Exercise on Anxiety-Related Behaviours and Motor Activity in Parkinson Mouse Model.
Over the allocated period within this experimental behavioural model, it is considered that: the decrease in the number of total movements, compared to the control group, corresponds to an anxiolytic or sedative effect in the laboratory animal (13), while the intensification of total motor activity is correlated with an anxious behaviour, in which the vertical movements correspond to the escape attempts of the animal placed in an unknown environment (14).
Taking into account the gastrointestinal motor activity of erythromycin, we speculate that an antimicrobial dose of erythromycin may be a major trigger for the onset of intussusception, particularly under gastrointestinal edema.
Few studies have been reported in the past 30 years, and the role of SO motor activity in CBD stones is still inconsistent [6-9,13,15,16].
ARF caused by CP has also seen reported to impair motor activity, cause depression-like behavior and hypoalgesia in mice.7 Other studies have also revealed alterations in the central nervous system (CNS) related to accumulation of uremic toxins and inflammatory mediators caused by hormonal imbalances in the brains of patients affected by ARF and chronic kidney disease (CKD).8
During this motor activity, referees presented a mean energy expenditure of only 3.04 [+ or -] 0.36 METs and 1.79 [+ or -] 0.30 kcal, just above resting values.
This study examines the following types of motor activity as observed while the children choose to perform outdoor and indoor activities (Goldhirsch, Wagner & Vinocor, 2002): social activity compared with individual activity (Larkin, 2009; Whitebread, Bingham, Grau, Pino Pasternak & Sangster, 2007); activity in large facilities and with small equipment (Gubbels, Van Kann & Jansen, 2012); and non-motor activity such as socio-dramatic games in the sand box, and in house-like and car-like structures (Fuligni, Howes, Huang, Hong & Lara-Cinisomo, 2012).
Results were calculated through The Wolf Motor Function Test and the Motor Activity Log to determine functional growth before and after treatment for each group.
Animals exposed to PQ showed significant impairment of motor activity, which could not be restored by MEL; however, in the 35th day improved motor activity in the MEL treated animals previously exposed to paraquat was observed, without reaching the levels of motor activity of their respective controls.
The motor activity log-28: Assessing daily use of the hemiparetic hand after stroke.
A multilevel framework for understanding consciousness is presented with elucidation of conscious and unconscious processes and discussion of neural hierarchies, especially as expressed through near-instantaneous adjustments to motor activity. The example of quick movement is used to introduce questions of decision, intuition, and causal consciousness, which are thoroughly explored in the last chapter contrasting usual decision-making processes with so-called rational choice.