motivational research


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motivational research

n.
Systematic analysis of the motives behind consumer decisions, used especially by advertisers and marketers to assess attitudes toward products and services. Also called motivation research.
References in periodicals archive ?
To discern this context, Morphological motivational research proposes a conception of conflicting motives that can never be conceived of as uniform and one-dimensional.
The Morphological motivational research on the use of lingerie demonstrated that in many cases American women still adhere to a comparatively prudish sexual ethos.
More recent motivational research focuses on the identification of effective techniques for enhancing instructional design, improving classroom management, and meeting the needs of diverse student populations (Wlodkowski, 1981).
Motivational research is most valuable when powerful underlying motives are suspected of exerting influence upon consumer behavior.
The three major motivational research techniques are observation, focus groups and depth interviews.
Walker Smith, managing partner of Yankelovich, said: "Audience measurement, the power of the impression, and motivational research represent the central elements of an integrated service for understanding online commercial opportunities.
Six appendices are included: (1) Request to Complete Project; (2) Motivational Research Student Survey; (3) Motivational Research Teacher Survey; (4) Oral Counting Raw Data With and Without Motivational Graphs; (5) Kindergarten Oral Counting Motivational Graphs; and (6) 1st Grade Oral Counting Motivational Graphs.
It has been argued that a contextualised or 'situative' approach to motivational research is required to develop our understandings of student motivation (Anderman & Anderman, 2000).
In 1946, he established the Institute for Motivational Research in Hastings-on-Hudson, and for the rest of his life practiced MR for profit and fun.
More recent motivational research focuses on the identification of effective techniques for enhancing instructional design and meeting the needs of diverse student populations (Wlodkowski R.
1 in the introductory chapter, who derived the name "motivational research" from the study of human motives (Williams, 1957).
Much motivational research has examined the role of attributions of perceived causes of outcomes.