motivational interviewing


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motivational interviewing

A form of directive, client-centered psychotherapy in which patients are encouraged to explore the discrepancies between what they hope to attain in their lives and how they currently live and behave. The therapist uses empathy while helping patients explore how change may positively affect their lives. Patients' natural resistance to change is accepted as normal and natural. Autonomy is fostered so that changes in speech and behavior are developed by the patient, not by the therapist. The technique is used in a variety of settings, including alcohol and drug rehabilitation.
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Motivational interviewing can be brief, and more helpful than providing only proscriptive advice
Originally designed for use in alcohol addiction treatment, the motivational interviewing techniques developed by Miller and Rolnick (7,8) should be common practice in the clinician's interactions with patients.
Participants implemented the presumptive/CASE approach for 4 months then crossed over and used motivational interviewing for an additional 4 months.
The sessions use standard motivational interviewing techniques to support individuals to reduce their drinking to lower risk levels.
She said: "Motivational interviewing is a useful technique to help engage with people who are going through the stress and worry of homelessness.
These included a social-based theory: Social Cognitive theory (n = 1) [62] or Social Ecological Model (n = 2) [35, 37]; a self-driving theory: Motivational Interviewing (n = 1) [59]; a behavioral change theory: Cognitive Behavioral Training (n = 1) [31] and Behavioral Change Framework (n = 1) [55]; or a combination of theories: Social Support Model, Social Cognitive Theory, and Stages of Change Trans-Theoretical [51] and the Health Belief Model, Motivational Interviewing, and Stages of Change Trans-Theoretical [60].
I could list all of the things that patients should or could do to prevent or even reverse disease states, in terms of eating right and exercising, but I think motivational interviewing is a more productive approach to elicit and evoke change (see "Principles and practice of motivational interviewing").
The researchers agreed that such programs in faith-based settings could improve moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and make participants more receptive to motivational interviewing calls.