motivational interview

motivational interview

Substance abuse A nonconfrontational counseling technique that may be used by a primary care giver to evaluate a substance–alcohol, illicit drug–abuser's receptiveness to treatment
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Recognizing the important role residents play in driving change, Lincoln plans to begin a train-the-trainer program "to ensure continuity of the program" and to expand motivational interview training while exploring expansion to the entire hospital across service lines and departments.
"Upon hearing the term "Motivational Interview", my initial thought was that I would be learning about a series of so-called 'manipulation techniques' I could use in the clinical setting to effectively persuade people to change in the ways I wanted them to through using motivation as the tactic.
The brief intervention relies primarily on a motivational interview to provide students with the skills, knowledge, and insight into the consequences of drinking.
This would be via a motivational interview or educational session about exercise, and completing surveys.
Some conversation points for those doing a motivational interview:
One intervention group received a quarterly visit from a counselor, who gathered information on their reproductive health-related behaviors, risks and intentions, and conducted a brief motivational interview; the other group received monthly visits from their counselor, who provided a broader array of services, including case management and assistance with life skills.
A motivational interview is a dialogue between the clinician and patient with specific steps.
(1997) described, but did not evaluate, a promising brief motivational interview that was designed to reduce smoking among adults in a general medical practice.
The motivational interviewing expert conducted systematic coaching sessions with each staff member at least once per month for three months prior to the intervention until each staff member was determined by the expert to be proficient in motivational interview delivery.
In a motivational interview, the patient should do most of the talking.
Published in the January 2005 issue of Drug and Alcohol Dependence, a study conducted by researchers at Boston University involved an intervention group in which participants received a motivational interview with a substance abuse outreach worker, referrals to treatment programs, a written list of treatment options, and a follow-up telephone call after 10 days.
A key concept in any motivational interview is that patients are unlikely to change their behavior unless they are ready to change.