motivational enhancement therapy

motivational enhancement therapy

A form of psychotherapy to overcome ambivalence and help people to reach desired goals. It is used to treat alcoholism, drug dependency, and anorexia/bulimia.
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This can be accomplished through hard work with a counselor, who may recommend any of a number of treatments, including contingency management, cognitive-behavioral therapy, systematic multidimensional family therapy, and motivational enhancement therapy, among others.
His "12-Step facilitation" intervention would be used in one of the three treatment arms in Project MATCH, a highly cited study in which nearly 2,000 individuals with an alcohol use disorder received either 12-Step facilitation, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or motivational enhancement therapy (MET).
Experts on motivational enhancement therapy from Yale University continue their support and consulting services for this highly significant project.
In randomized trials, the individual feedback component of motivational enhancement therapy (an adaptation of MI; Miller, Zweben, DiClemente, & Rychtarik, 1992) delivered in writing has yielded significant reduction in heavy alcohol consumption relative to an informational control condition (Agostinelli, Brown, & Miller, 1995; Waiters, Vader, & Harris, 2007).
Motivational enhancement therapy is a brief counselling method for enhancing motivation to change problematic health behaviours by exploring and resolving ambivalence.
The effect of motivational enhancement therapy and coping skills training on the self-efficacy and motivation of incarcerated male alcohol abusers.
Treasure JL, Katzman M, Schmidt U, Troop N, Todd G, de Silva P Engagement and outcome in the treatment of bulimia nervosa: first phase of a sequential design comparing motivational enhancement therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy.
Motivational enhancement therapy, or motivational interviewing (MI), is a brief intervention designed to enhance a person's motivation to make changes regarding AOD use and those life situations that may trigger or sustain AOD use.
MC is an integration of motivational interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 2002) and motivational enhancement therapy (Miller et al.
These approaches include ones based on Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET; Monti et al.
These include core conflict relationship theme therapy, motivational enhancement therapy, interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral therapy, and dialectic behavior therapy.
Psychosocial interventions provide individuals in recovery with the skills to maintain sobriety and include cognitive behavioural therapy, motivational enhancement therapy and spiritual 12-step programmes, and address social needs such as homelessness, unemployment and family reintegration.