two-factor theory

(redirected from motivation-hygiene theory)

two-factor theory

A theory on human motivation which holds that people do not work harder or more efficiently until internal or maintenance factors (“dissatisfiers”—e.g., salary, status, work conditions) are met; motivational factors (“satisfiers”), such as achievement, advancement and responsibility, act independently of maintenance factors to increase motivation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Motivation-hygiene theory (figure 1) was developed by Frederick Herzberg, who first conceptualized it in 1959 and subsequently refined it over the next 24 years.
The motivation-hygiene theory provided the framework for this pilot study (Herzberg, Mausner, & Snyderman, 1959).
The theoretical framework will be a combination of elements of the motivation-hygiene theory (Herzberg, 1959) and the life-cycle model of clusters (Arthurs et al., 2007).
One of the most well-known research projects involved Frederick Herzberg (1959, 1966) focusing on human motivation, now referred to as his classic motivation-hygiene theory.
What's significant about the motivation-hygiene theory is the recognition that just because people are not dissatisfied doesn't necessarily mean that they are satisfied.
Unfortunately, this conclusion implies that the basic tenants of the motivation-hygiene theory may not hold true for faculty in the University.
In Part II, he explains key concepts of Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory and applies them to industry; material in this section is based on the author's thesis submitted to Oxford University for a higher research degree.
In his motivation-hygiene theory, American behavioural scientist Frederick Herzberg observed that certain factors in the workplace caused job satisfaction while a separate set of factors led to dissatisfaction.
Employment motivation of summer job seekers in recreation settings: A test of Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory. Journal of Park and Recreation Administration, 6, 66-73.
Motivation-Hygiene Theory was used to determine methods of retention within the categories of hygiene factors and motivator factors.
The importance of interesting work is also supported by Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory. His theory posits that employees are motivated by their own inherent need to succeed at a challenging task.
His behavioral studies led him to his "motivation-hygiene theory." He asked workers to describe when they felt exceptionally good and bad about their jobs.