mother-infant bonding


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mother-infant bonding

The emotional and physical attachment between infant and mother that is initiated in the first hour or two after normal delivery of a baby who has not been dulled by anesthetic agents or drugs. It is believed that the stronger this bond, the greater the chances of a mentally healthy infant-mother relationship in both the short- and long-term periods after childbirth. For that reason, the initial contact between mother and infant should be in the delivery room and the contact should continue for as long as possible in the first hours after birth. It is also called mother-infant attachment.
See also: bonding
References in periodicals archive ?
Has your obstetric unit developed cesarean delivery practices to initiate early mother-infant bonding? Do you think that immediate mother-infant skin-to-skin contact is safe at cesarean delivery?
Healthcare professionals and childbirth educators working with pre and post-partum mothers see the importance of mother-infant bonding. The process of bonding, especially through maternal role attainment, is essential for basic survival needs of the child and mental health needs of both the mother and child.
The results highlight the adverse effects of maternal postpartum depression and PTSD on mother-infant bonding in early postpartum in women with child abuse and neglect histories.
The finding suggests that oxytocin, a hormone also involved in mother-infant bonding, plays an important role in the initial stages of romantic attachments.
Emerging human studies are providing stronger evidence between the relationship of oxytocin and mother-infant bonding. Oxytocin levels across pregnancy seem to facilitate postnatal maternal behavior and an emotional bond between mother and infant by reducing anxiety and improving response to stressors.
Concerns have also been raised over the impact of new practice guidelines for health visitors that restrict the time available to assess issues such as mother-infant bonding (Milford and Oates, 2009).
The pleasures of birth allow for better mother-infant bonding. Orgasmic pleasures are a continuation of the act of conception itself.
The fetus is capable of learning the odor of the mother which is essential to mother-infant bonding, successful breastfeeding, and a later healthier diet.