moss


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Moss

(mos),
Gerald, U.S. physician, 1931-1973. See: Moss tube.

Moss

(mos),
Melvin L., 20th-century U.S. oral pathologist. See: Gorlin-Chaudhry-Moss syndrome.

moss

(mos),
1. Any low growing, delicate cryptogamous plant of the class Musci.
2. Popularly, any one of a number of lichens and seaweeds.
[A.S. meōs]

moss

Any low-growing green plant of the class Musci.

Iceland moss

An edible lichen, Cetraria islandica. It is a demulcent that has been promoted as a treatment for bladder, kidney and lung diseases.

Irish moss

1. Carrageen.
2. Carrageenan.

peat moss

1. Any moss of the large genus Sphagnum whose decomposed and compacted remains form peat. The moss is absorptive and acidic and inhibits growth of bacteria and fungi. Synonym: sphagnum moss
2. The decomposed and compacted remains of the mosses, used as a soil conditioner and as a dressing for wounds. It has also been used by some primitive people as a form of external menstrual protection. Synonym: sphagnum moss

sphagnum moss

Peat moss.

moss

any bryophyte of the class Musci. Usually these are small plants (less than 5 cm high) attached to moist or wet substrates by rhizoids; this is the SPOROPHYTE generation. The sexual organs are borne on a GAMETOPHYTE generation and the ANTHERIDIA and ARCHEGONIA are on separate leaf rosettes. The male gametes are motile and after fertilization a diploid sporophyte is produced, within which haploid spores are developed, each spore giving rise to a protonema from which the new gametophyte develops.
References in classic literature ?
Moss, too fagged by toil and children to have strength left for any pride.
Moss into the garden, toward an old yew-tree arbor, while his sister stood tapping her baby on the back and looking wistfully after them.
Moss, who, when he married Miss Tulliver, had been regarded as the buck of Basset, now wore a beard nearly a week old, and had the depressed, unexpectant air of a machine-horse.
Moss, "but I was so unlucky wi' the wool last year; and what with the Missis being laid up so, things have gone awk'arder nor usual.
Moss, deprecatingly; "I know there isn't a day-laborer works harder.
Moss, looking blankly before him, "we'd better be sold up, and ha' done with it; I must part wi' every head o' stock I've got, to pay you and the landlord too.
The chase led him across swampy ground in the bottom of the valley, and he came upon footprints in the soggy moss.
He stood like a statue till the danger was past, when he yielded to a fit of trembling and sank down into the wet moss.
He was squatting in the moss, a bone in his mouth, sucking at the shreds of life that still dyed it faintly pink.
When he started to collect dry moss, he found he could not rise to his feet.
He followed the trail of the other man who dragged himself along, and soon came to the end of it - a few fresh-picked bones where the soggy moss was marked by the foot-pads of many wolves.
His knees had become raw meat like his feet, and though he padded them with the shirt from his back it was a red track he left behind him on the moss and stones.