mortality

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mortality

 [mor-tal´ĭ-te]
the quality of being mortal.
2. the ratio of actual deaths to expected deaths.

mor·tal·i·ty

(mōr-tal'i-tē),
1. The state of being mortal.
2. Synonym(s): death rate
3. A fatal outcome.
[L. mortalitas, fr. mors (mort-), death]

mortality

/mor·tal·i·ty/ (mor-tal´it-e)
1. the quality of being mortal.
2. see death rate, under rate.
3. the ratio of actual deaths to expected deaths.

mortality

Etymology: L, mortalis, perishable
1 the condition of being subject to death.
2 the death rate, which reflects the number of deaths per unit of population in any specific region, age group, disease, or other classification, usually expressed as deaths per 1000, 10,000, or 100,000.

mortality

(1) Death, see there.
(2) Mortality rate, see there.

mortality

Death rate Epidemiology A health statistic that corresponds to the total number of deaths per unit time in a population divided by the population's number, ergo deaths/1000 population. See Infant mortality, Neonatal mortality, Operative mortality, Post-neonatal mortality, Proportionate mortality.
Mortality–data of interest
Leading causes of mortality–US Cardiovascular–ASHD and aneurysm disease 39%, CA 22%, CVAs 7.6%, accidents 4.6%, pneumonia or influenza 3%, lung disease 3%, DM-related 1.8%, suicide 1.4%, cirrhosis 1.3%, nephritis 1.0%, homicide 1.0%, etc to 100%
Mortality rate in viral infections Rabies 99%, HIV 50+%, Ebola 20-80%, HBV 3-5%, polio ± 0.1%
Mortality < age 19 Fatal injuries–MVAs 47%–33% occupants, 8% pedestrians, homicide 13%–usually firearms, suicide 9.6%–?:/, 4:1, drowning 9%–most common in those < age 4, 90% in residential pools, fire/burns 7%–most < age 4, black:white ratio, 3:1  

mor·tal·i·ty

(mōr-tal'i-tē)
1. The state of being mortal.
2. Synonym(s): death rate.
3. A fatal outcome.

mor·tal·i·ty

(mōr-tal'i-tē)
1. State of being mortal.
2. A fatal outcome.

mortality

1. the quality of being mortal.
2. death as a statistic.

embryonic mortality
see early embryonic mortality.
mortality rate
the death rate; the ratio of the total number of deaths to the total number of the population during a specified time period. Commonly used specific mortality rates include disease, case fatality, neonatal, perinatal and preweaning mortality rates.
The rate may also be expressed as a standardized rate, when it is stated as a ratio of the expected death rate in a standard group of animals. It may also be expressed as a proportional rate, when it is stated as a proportion of all of deaths due to all causes in the group.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the reasons behind high newborn mortality rate, the report says that this is partly because newborn deaths are difficult to address with a single drug or intervention and they require a system-wide approach.
I don't feel reassured that our infant mortality rate is that much better than others - it's just right at the national average - so I wouldn't say it's really good.
Had the mortality rates of 2000 continued unchanged, about 39 million children would have died.
As shown in the map, the lowest cardiovascular mortality rates were in counties around San Francisco, central Colorado, northern Nebraska, central Minnesota, northeastern Virginia, and southern Florida.
It has been predicted that increasing the number of effectively-operating third step intensive care units will decrease especially the early neonatal mortality rates.
Our target is to reduce neonatal mortality rate to less than 25/1000 till 2018 while currently the rate is 55/1000, he said.
As an example of a potential policy lever, they point to home nurse visiting programs, which have been shown to reduce post-neonatal mortality rates in randomized trials.
Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to test the statistical significance of the difference in short-term mortality rates between RP and EBRT.
No hospitals in Arkansas placed in the top 10 for the lowest mortality rates.
The report also claims that Oman, Bahrain, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have under-five mortality rates that are among the lowest in the world, ranging between seven and 10 deaths per 1,000 live births, and Kuwait is close to achieving a similarly low under-five mortality rate.
Deaths from HIV/AIDS have fallen dramatically in the United States, yet lower-income Americans still suffer high mortality rates due to their lack of access to HIV prevention and other health care services, lack of knowledge about their HIV status, HIV stigma, and marginalization.
However, we're very keen to focus on the future, where we will aim to maintain consistently low mortality rates coupled with high standards of care.