morphology

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Related to morphologists: morphology, morphological

morphology

 [mor″fol´o-je]
1. the science of the form and structure of organisms.
2. the form and structure of a particular organism, organ, tissue, or cell. adj., adj morpholog´ic.

mor·phol·o·gy

(mōr-fol'ō-jē), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word as a synonym of form or appearance.
The science concerned with the configuration or the structure of animals and plants.
[morpho- + G. logos, study]

morphology

(môr-fŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. morpholo·gies
a. The branch of biology that deals with the form and structure of organisms without consideration of function.
b. The form and structure of an organism or one of its parts: the morphology of a cell; the morphology of vertebrates.

mor′pho·log′i·cal (-fə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), mor′pho·log′ic adj.
mor′pho·log′i·cal·ly adv.
mor·phol′o·gist n.

morphology

Linguistics
The formal study of morphemes.
 
Science
The science of the form and structure of organisms—plants, animals and other forms of life.

Vox populi
The appearance or shape of a thing.

anemia

Hematology A condition characterized by ↓ RBCs or Hb in the blood, resulting in ↓ O2 in peripheral tissues Clinical Fatigability, pallor, palpitations, SOB; anemias are divided into various groups based on cause–eg, iron deficiency anemia, megaloblastic anemia–due to ↓ vitamin B12 or folic acid, or aplastic anemia–where RBC precursors in BM are 'wiped out'. See Anemia of chronic disease, Anemia of investigation, Anemia of prematurity, Aplastic anemia, Arctic anemia, Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, Cloverleaf anemia, Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, Dilutional anemia, Dimorphic anemia, Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia, Fanconi anemia, Hemolytic anemia, Idiopathic sideroblastic anemia, Immune anemia, Iron-deficiency anemia, Juvenile pernicious anemia, Macrocytic anemia, Megaloblastic anemia, Microcytic anemia, Myelophthisic anemia, Neutropenic colitis with aplastic anemia, Nonimmune hemolytic anemia, Pseudoanemia, Refractory anemia with excess blasts, Sickle cell anemia, Sideroblastic anemia, Sports anemia.
General groups of anemia
Morphology
Macrocytic
Megaloblastic anemia
  • Vitamin B12deficiency
  • Folic acid deficiency
Microcytic hypochromic
  • Iron-deficiency anemia
  • Hereditary defects
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Thalassemia
  • Other hemoglobinopathies
Normocytic
  • Acute blood loss
  • Hemolysis
  • BM failure
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Renal failure
Etiology
Deficiency
  • Iron
  • Vitamin B12
  • Folic acid
  • Pyridoxine
Central–due to BM failure
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Anemia of senescence
  • Malignancy
    • BM replacement by tumor
    • Toxicity due to chemotherapy
    • Primary BM malignancy, eg leukemia
Peripheral
  • Hemorrhage
  • Hemolysis
.

mor·phol·o·gy

(mōr-fol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the configuration or the structure of animals and plants.
[morpho- + G. logos, study]

morphology

the study of the shape, general appearance or form of an organism, as distinct from ANATOMY which involves dissection to discover structure.

Morphology

Literally, the study of form. In medicine, morphology refers to the size, shape and structure rather than the function of a given organ. As a diagnostic imaging technique, ultrasound facilitates the recognition of abnormal morphologies as symptoms of underlying conditions.

mor·phol·o·gy

(mōr-fol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the configuration or the structure of animals and plants.
[morpho- + G. logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
More complex samples from patients with haematological malignancies, recent bone marrow transplantation and morphological changes associated with some infections, require the attention of a morphologist to accurately identify and classify immature cells.
The Swiss urban morphologist Sylvain Malfroy puts forward the notion that the regeneration of derelict industrial areas should indeed be understood as "a work of completion" (1998a, 141), in that such sites are embedded in the surrounding urban fabrics and bear the traces of a long sedimentation of urban material culture that could inform and guide contemporary actions.
It is concerned with the development of a morphological module in computational linguistic applications and with how this can be put to use by morphologists in their research, or in machine translation systems, etc.
(6) In their attempts to understand and elaborate that framework, urban morphologists have pursued a variety of strategies.
For example, Salthe and Crump (1977) showed that traits of frog hindlimbs (ratios of measurements) considered to be important for jumping were less variable than traits considered by functional morphologists to be less important in this regard.
The grammar should hold wide appeal, not just for linguists of various stripes (typologists, syntacticlans, morphologists, semanticists, phonologists), but also for anthropologists.
Donskis's field is the comparative study of civilizations, and his four morphologists of culture are chosen because they represent this study.
Similarly, since his mentors were mainly morphologists, Brooks largely confined his research and teaching to morphology [25].
He does give us direct illustrations of the progressionism of some evolutionary morphologists. And anyhow the issue is more relevant to the nineteenth- than the twentieth-century discussions, back when morphological approaches to evolution were more prominent.
It should be noted that morphologists may be prone to looking hard for characters to resolve tough groupings, and may stop looking for more characters that would bolster well-supported clades.
German morphologists (notably, Ernst Haeckel, Carl Gegenbaur, and Anton Dohrn) figure heavily in his account, and thus Bowler covers some of the same ground as Lynn Nyhart in her Biology Takes Form which also appeared in 1996.