morphology

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morphology

 [mor″fol´o-je]
1. the science of the form and structure of organisms.
2. the form and structure of a particular organism, organ, tissue, or cell. adj., adj morpholog´ic.

mor·phol·o·gy

(mōr-fol'ō-jē), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word as a synonym of form or appearance.
The science concerned with the configuration or the structure of animals and plants.
[morpho- + G. logos, study]

morphology

/mor·phol·o·gy/ (mor-fol´ah-je) the science of the forms and structure of organisms; the form and structure of a particular organism, organ, or part.morpholog´icmorpholog´ical

morphology

(môr-fŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. morpholo·gies
a. The branch of biology that deals with the form and structure of organisms without consideration of function.
b. The form and structure of an organism or one of its parts: the morphology of a cell; the morphology of vertebrates.

mor′pho·log′i·cal (-fə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), mor′pho·log′ic adj.
mor′pho·log′i·cal·ly adv.
mor·phol′o·gist n.

morphology

[môrfol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, morphe + logos, science
the study of the physical shape and size of a specimen, plant, or animal. morphological, adj.

morphology

Linguistics
The formal study of morphemes.
 
Science
The science of the form and structure of organisms—plants, animals and other forms of life.

Vox populi
The appearance or shape of a thing.

anemia

Hematology A condition characterized by ↓ RBCs or Hb in the blood, resulting in ↓ O2 in peripheral tissues Clinical Fatigability, pallor, palpitations, SOB; anemias are divided into various groups based on cause–eg, iron deficiency anemia, megaloblastic anemia–due to ↓ vitamin B12 or folic acid, or aplastic anemia–where RBC precursors in BM are 'wiped out'. See Anemia of chronic disease, Anemia of investigation, Anemia of prematurity, Aplastic anemia, Arctic anemia, Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, Cloverleaf anemia, Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, Dilutional anemia, Dimorphic anemia, Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia, Fanconi anemia, Hemolytic anemia, Idiopathic sideroblastic anemia, Immune anemia, Iron-deficiency anemia, Juvenile pernicious anemia, Macrocytic anemia, Megaloblastic anemia, Microcytic anemia, Myelophthisic anemia, Neutropenic colitis with aplastic anemia, Nonimmune hemolytic anemia, Pseudoanemia, Refractory anemia with excess blasts, Sickle cell anemia, Sideroblastic anemia, Sports anemia.
General groups of anemia
Morphology
Macrocytic
Megaloblastic anemia
  • Vitamin B12deficiency
  • Folic acid deficiency
Microcytic hypochromic
  • Iron-deficiency anemia
  • Hereditary defects
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Thalassemia
  • Other hemoglobinopathies
Normocytic
  • Acute blood loss
  • Hemolysis
  • BM failure
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Renal failure
Etiology
Deficiency
  • Iron
  • Vitamin B12
  • Folic acid
  • Pyridoxine
Central–due to BM failure
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Anemia of senescence
  • Malignancy
    • BM replacement by tumor
    • Toxicity due to chemotherapy
    • Primary BM malignancy, eg leukemia
Peripheral
  • Hemorrhage
  • Hemolysis
.

mor·phol·o·gy

(mōr-fol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the configuration or the structure of animals and plants.
[morpho- + G. logos, study]

morphology

the study of the shape, general appearance or form of an organism, as distinct from ANATOMY which involves dissection to discover structure.

Morphology

Literally, the study of form. In medicine, morphology refers to the size, shape and structure rather than the function of a given organ. As a diagnostic imaging technique, ultrasound facilitates the recognition of abnormal morphologies as symptoms of underlying conditions.

morphology,

n method for classifying the body constitution type. See also constitution, carbonic; constitution, fluoric; constitution, phosphoric; and constitution, sulphuric.

mor·phol·o·gy

(mōr-fol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the configuration or the structure of animals and plants.
[morpho- + G. logos, study]

morphology

(môrfol´əjē),
n the branch of biology that deals with the form and structure of an organism or part, without regard to function.
morphology, determinants of occlusal,
n.pl variable factors that determine the forms given to the crowns of teeth restored in metals, such as mandibular centricity; the intercondylar distance; the distance of teeth from the sagittal plane; the character of lateral and protrusive paths of the condylar axes; and the overlaps of the anterior teeth and wear.

morphology

the science of the forms and structure of organisms; the form and structure of a particular organism, organ, tissue or cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, the phylogenetic tree generated using COI and tRNA/COII sequences of morphologically similar Aphis spp.
Immediately after collection, each ejaculate was kept at 37degC and evaluated for physical characteristics including ejaculatory volume, mass activity, individual sperm motility, sperm concentration, and percentages of morphologically normal spermatozoa and those with intact acrosome (acrosome integrity).
All adult ticks were morphologically identified as Rh.
In this study, the children had to make a lexical decision on derived words that were preceded by others, morphologically or orthographically related.
in length, seem morphologically abnormal shape, colour and condition (Figure 3).
Among the topics to be discussed at this years meeting are new polymer chemistries and biomaterials, inorganic nanosystems, cell responses to morphologically differentiated materials, stem cells, and regenerative medicine, as well as new materials for the delivery of active agents in cosmetic, food, and other industrial applications.
The abundant cytoplasmic inclusions in neutrophilic leukocytes (black arrow) morphologically resemble Dohle bodies, which are frequently found in macrothrombocytopenias, such as May-Hegglin anomaly (1).
It is plausible that the "lung" (or lungs, depending on species) of modern lungfishes--virtually identical morphologically to the lungs of tetrapods--represents the ancestral (or primitive) condition seen in some of the now-extinct "transitional" fishes alluded to in the article.
Morphologically, the blemishes are collapsed hypodermis tissues related to shrunken or destroyed oil glands.
If we find different color morphs in otherwise morphologically similar individuals, how do we decide whether we are dealing with a single, polymorphic species or with separate species?
Results: Out of these 37 masses, 19 were morphologically benign and pathology revealed the same results.