morphine

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morphine

 [mor´fēn]
the principal and most active opium alkaloid, an opioid analgesic and respiratory depressant, usually used as the sulfate salt and administered orally, parenterally, or rectally. It is used as an analgesic for relief of severe pain, antitussive, adjunct to anesthesia, and adjunct to treatment of pulmonary edema caused by left ventricular failure. Its use carries with it the dangers of addiction (see drug dependence), as well as drug tolerance (the need for increasingly larger doses over time to achieve the desired effect). Since morphine is a powerful respiratory depressant, it should be withheld and the patient carefully assessed if the patient's respirations are less than 12 per minute.

mor·phine

(mōr'fēn, mōr-fēn'),
The major phenanthrene alkaloid of opium; it produces a combination of depression and excitation in the central nervous system and some peripheral tissues; predominance of either central stimulation or depression depends on the species and dose; repeated administration leads to the development of tolerance, physical dependence, and (if abused) psychic dependence. Used as an analgesic, sedative, and anxiolytic.
[L. Morpheus, god of dreams or of sleep]

morphine

(môr′fēn′)
n.
An alkaloid, C17H19NO3, extracted from opium and used in the form of its hydrated sulfate or hydrochloride salt to relieve moderate to severe pain. Also called morphia.

morphine

An opium alkaloid with potent analgesic effect that owes its narcotic properties to its unique aromatic ring structure.
 
Clinical findings
Euphoria, respiratory depression, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, decreased GI motility, increased risk of addiction.

Route
Parenteral, oral.
 
Effects
Blocks pain signals to brain and spinal cord.
 
Uses
Relieves severe acute and chronic pain; facilitates induction of anaesthesia.

morphine

Pain management An opium alkaloid with potent analgesic effect that owes its narcotic properties to its particular aromatic ring structure Route Parenteral, oral Effects Blocks pain signals to brain and spinal cord Uses Relieves severe acute and chronic pain; facilitates induction of anesthesia Clinical Euphoria, respiratory depression, drowsiness, N&V, ↓ GI motility, risk of addiction, miosis. See Controlled drug substances, Designer drugs, Heroin, Substance abuse.

mor·phine

(mōr'fēn)
The major phenanthrene alkaloid of opium, which contains 9-14% of anhydrous morphine. It produces a combination of depression and excitation in the central nervous system and some peripheral tissues; predominance of either central stimulation or depression depends on the species and dose; repeated administration leads to the development of tolerance, physical dependence, and (in instances of abuse) psychic dependence. Used as an analgesic, sedative, and anxiolytic. Classified as a U.S. Schedule II controlled medication.
[L. Morpheus, god of dreams and sleep]

morphine

A powerful pain-killing and narcotic drug used to control persistent pain that cannot be relieved by lesser drugs. It can be taken by mouth or given by injection. Morphine has a valuable effect on the emotional response to pain and in relieving the anxiety associated with the contemplation of the implications of severe pain. It is a respiratory depressant and is never given in cases of head injury or in other conditions in which respiration may be prejudiced. When appropriately prescribed addiction is unlikely. The drug is on the WHO official list. Brand names are Morcap SR, MST Continus, MXL, Oramorph, Sevredol and Zomorph. The drug is also formulated with the anti-emetic cyclizine under the brand name Cyclimorph.

morphine

a white, crystalline, narcotic alkaloid drug obtained from opium. Formula: C17H19NO3

Morphine

Morphine is the naturally occurring opioid in the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. It is a powerful narcotic analgesic, and its primary clinical use is in the management of moderately severe to severe pain. After heroin, morphine has the greatest potential for addiction of all narcotic analgesics.
Mentioned in: Methadone

mor·phine

(mōr'fēn)
The major phenanthrene alkaloid of opium. Used as an analgesic, sedative, and anxiolytic.
[L. Morpheus, god of dreams and sleep]
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