morpheme


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mor·pheme

(mōr'fēm),
The smallest linguistic unit with a meaning.
[G. morphē, form + -eme, from phoneme, G. phēmē, utterance]

morpheme

The smallest semantically meaningful unit of a spoken language (words, prefixes or suffixes) that have discrete meanings. The formal study of morphemes is termed morphology.

morpheme

(mor'fem)
The smallest meaningful grammatical unit in a language (e.g., the s in “beds”).
See: phoneme

morpheme

The smallest element of speech that conveys either factual or grammatical information. Compare with phoneme which is a speech sound that serves to distinguish one word from another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Statistical information is applied to morpheme combination with additionally imposed constraints [17].
Previous research (Gagne & Spalding 2014d; Libben, Weber & Miwa 2012; Libben & Weber 2014) found that the time to type the letter after the morpheme boundary was longer than the time to type the letter before the morpheme boundary.
Communication is meaning-dependent, and these meanings depend on the make-up of words which are the morphemes which in turn are environment dependent.
The first aspect is the use of negative auxiliaries in Mari, a technique which can be described briefly by saying that negative bases are suffixed with morphemes of grammatical person, tense and mood.
Similar examples of words in which morpheme boundaries can easily be misconstrued are
Words were grouped by common morphemes, for example, words like native, nature, natural, naturally, naturalistic, nation, national, nationwide, nationality, all connected by the root morpheme nat--(root morpheme meaning source, birth or tribe).
Do transposed-letter similarity effects occur at a morpheme level?
rd] person singular marker -s might be a morpheme difficult to acquire, because it is not a perceptually salient morpheme, since (i) it has a low number of phones (i.
This morpheme is found with all persons and numbers and therefore I strongly believe that this interpretation must be abandoned (see Campbell, "The Old Hurrian Verb," SMEA 49 [2007]: 76-80).
As mentioned before, the program is designed to parse the lemma from the morpheme and count the token for the base word, calculating other measures afterwards.
Their results show that the ability to reflect on the morphemes contributes greatly for reading and writing, and this contribution is, to some extent, independent of phonological processing.
However, this morpheme does not seem to be productive anymore in Domari, although more research is needed to confirm this claim.