mores


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mo·res

(mo'rāz), This word is grammatically plural.
A concept used in the behavioral and social sciences to refer to centrally important and accepted folkways, and cultural norms that embody the fundamental moral views of a group.
[L. pl. of mos, custom]

mores

(mō′rāz) [L.]
Habits and customs of society; usually those that come to be regarded as being essential to the survival and well-being of the society.
References in periodicals archive ?
It lasted more than 21 hours, almost an hour shorter compared to the one in 2018.
Using the boni mores principle to establish the validity of consent to health research
For all of these strengths, The Ethics and Mores of Race faces some significant difficulties.
The Greek word gunai designates, according to context, either "women" or "wives," and in the New Testament it more often has the specific meaning.
Hot Under the Collar, which contains more than 250 letters (out of 5,000 published by the publication in 50 years), is available at the Anglican Book Centre (416-924-1332 or 1-800-268-1168 in U.S.
Berry believes that the natural world is more than the stage for humanity to strut its stuff.
The association promotes the art of black storytelling and passes on the folklore, legends, myths, fables and mores of Africans and their descendants.
What are the processes, rules, regulations and mores that govern doing "tax" business overseas?
Throughout the book, which is rich in Celtic lore, Shirley Roe demonstrates a detailed knowledge of Celtic mores, customs, philosophy and religious practices.
Lord gives the reader an honest look into how the mores of her father's time and their evolution affected her relationship with him, her personal growth, and the backstage story of a rocket lab.
This despite the fact that a cursory review of Sweden's emancipated social mores would confirm that the nation's women are in no peril of being compelled to swaddle themselves in burkhas.