Morbillivirus

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Mor·bil·li·vi·rus

(mōr-bil'i-vī'rŭs),
A genus in the family Paramyxoviridae, including measles, canine distemper, and bovine rinderpest viruses.

morbillivirus

(môr-bĭl′ĭ-vī′rəs)
n.
Any of a genus of paramyxoviruses, including the causal agents of measles and rinderpest, that infect humans and other vertebrates.

Morbillivirus

A genus of viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family, including canine distemper virus, rinderpest virus, measles virus and equine morbillivirus, the last of which may rarely infect humans.

Mor·bil·li·vi·rus

(mōr-bil'i-vī'rŭs)
A genus in the family Paramyxoviridae, including measles, canine distemper, and bovine rinderpest viruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mollusks as a natural reservoir of morbilliviruses. Dokl Biol Sci.
Characterization of morbilliviruses isolated from dolphins and porpoises in Europe.
Two morbilliviruses implicated in bottlenose dolphin epizootics.
The immune suppression is not only observed during natural infections but also after vaccination with attenuated strains of Morbilliviruses (Hussey et al.
Several strains of morbilliviruses have been associated with illness and death in marine mammals (50).
This variation was previously reported in other related morbilliviruses (13) and does not control any change in the tertiary structure of H antigen, as determined by using the SWISS-MODEL (http://swissmodel.
Recombinant morbilliviruses (segmented or nonsegmented) containing unique rinderpest virus nucleic acid or amino acid sequences are considered to be rinderpest virus.
As more sequence data become available for PPRV and the other morbilliviruses, ancestral origins of each virus and intraspecies differentiation might become more clear.
CeMV is more closely related to ruminant morbilliviruses and human measles virus than to canine and phocine distemper viruses (1,2).
Serologic surveys indicate that morbilliviruses infect marine mammals worldwide (5); however, only 1 fatal case in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been confirmed in the Southern Hemisphere (in the southwestern Pacific Ocean) (6).
Three cetacean morbilliviruses have been identified: porpoise morbillivirus, isolated from harbor porpoises that died along the coast of Ireland (6); dolphin morbillivirus (DMV), first identified in striped dolphins from the Mediterranean Sea (2); and pilot whale morbillivirus, isolated from a long-finned pilot whale stranded in New Jersey, USA (7).
Morbilliviruses can switch hosts, and new ecologic niches created by the eradication of rinderpest may provide opportunities for PPR emergence in new hosts (4,5).