morbid obesity


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

mor·bid o·be·si·ty

obesity sufficient to prevent normal activity or physiologic function, or to cause the onset of a pathologic condition.
A condition defined as a BMI of greater than 40 kg/m2. MO is common in the US and increasingly so in developed countries. The co-morbidities of morbid obesity are those of obesity, but more severe—type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease/heart disease, sleep dypnoea, osteoarthritis and a 25–33% increased risk of breast, colorectal, endometrial, kidney, oesophageal and prostate cancer and an even higher risk of gallbladder cancer
Management Managing morbid obesity requires lifestyle changes including exercise, or surgery, which offers various solutions in the form of bypasses, resections, staples, etc. Bariatric surgery may result in significant weight loss, but potential jejuno-ileal bypass complications include steatorrhoea, liver failure, cirrhosis, oxalate deposition, gallstone formation, electrolyte imbalance—decreased Ca2+, Mg2+, K+—hypovitaminosis, psychologic problems, polyarthropathy, hair loss, pancreatitis, colonic pseudoobstruction, intussusception, pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis, and blind loop syndrome
Note: Mutations in the leptin gene are linked to insatiable appetite, morbid obesity and clinical defects which respond to leptin therapy. However, leptin gene mutations are ‘case report rare’ and for most of those suffering from morbid obesity, the problem is not genetic

morbid obesity

Superobesity Bariatircs A condition defined as 45 kg > ideal body weight, 2 times > ideal/standard weight or, for children, a triceps skin fold > 95th percentile of all children; despite significant weight loss following jejuno-ileal bypass, the procedure is complicated by steatorrhea, hepatic failure, cirrhosis, oxalate deposition, bile stone formation, electrolyte imbalance–↓ Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, hypovitaminosis, psychologic problems, polyarthropathy, hair loss, pancreatitis, colonic pseudoobstruction, intussusception, pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis, blind loop syndrome. See Gastric balloon, Obesity, Pickwick syndrome.

mor·bid o·be·si·ty

(mōr'bid ō-bē'si-tē)
Being sufficiently overweight so as to prevent normal activity or physiologic function or to cause the onset of a pathologic condition; BMI ≥40.

mor·bid o·be·si·ty

(mōr'bid ō-bē'si-tē)
Obesity sufficient to prevent normal activity or physiologic function or to cause the onset of a pathologic condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yes 1,103 (97.7) No 26 (2.3) What is morbid obesity? People who have a BMI of 58 (5.1) >24.9 kg/[m.sup.2] People who have a BMI of [greater than 148 (13.1) or equal to] 30 kg/[m.sup.2] People who have a BMI of 40 563 (49.9) or of 34-40 with significant medical problems I don't know 360 (31.9) Is there a difference between obesity and morbid obesity?
Among the examined risk factors, obesity, especially morbid obesity, had the most significant impact on early cancer onset for all four cancers.
Keywords: Intracranial lesions, children, morbid obesity, magnetic resonance imaging
Morbid obesity is diagnosed by determining Body Mass Index, which is defined by the ratio of an individual's height to his or her weight.
The results of our study show that gene polymorphisms of ABO (rs505922), F5 (rs6427196), MTHFR (rs1801133), and FGG (rs6536024) are not associated with the presence of morbid obesity among European subjects.
control of diet, regular exercise and modifying life-style along with efforts with pharmaceutical products, failed to reduce the weight and bariatric surgery apparently offers solution still patients with morbid obesity are reluctant to opt for it why?
The UK has one of the highest percentages of obesity in Europe - 64 per cent of adults are classified as being overweight or obese, although clearly a much smaller percentage would fall within the definition of morbid obesity. The Equality Act would need to be applied very differently if employers were required to treat obesity the same as any other physical or mental impairment.
He had no family history of morbid obesity or genetic abnormalities and a CT scan of his brain showed no other possible causes of obesity.
Rana is also suffering from morbid obesity, weighing around 280 kg.
Although it is a minority of obesity cases (< 10% of total), the group with morbid obesity (BMI > 40 kg [m.sup.-2]) is the fastest growing in Western world (TINOCO et al., 2002).
Davenport candidly shared with me his own personal experience with the challenges of obesity "My father suffered from morbid obesity and had a stroke related to his disease in 1996," Davenport said.