morality

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morality

 [mo-ral´ĭ-te]
accordance with widely shared conventions of right or good conduct that form a stable, but usually incomplete, social consensus; it includes the concept of moral ideals. See also virtue.
principle-based common morality a type of ethical thinking based on premises that are unphilosophical common sense and tradition and come from the morality shared by members of a society. Principle-based theories have an emphasis on obligation and are pluralistic (in contrast to teleological and deontological theories, which are monistic, i.e., have one supreme, absolute principle supporting all other guides in the system). The principles are generally accepted in most types of ethical theory and are what are called “middle level” principles in that they are not the most general principles but are those likely to be acceptable to proponents of different normative theories. This type of thinking has been most influential in bioethics and in nursing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, what this might mean for young adults or for the church often lacks specificity, if not rigor, and is hostage to a certain moralizing that expresses a humid mixture of condescension, guilt, and envy by pastors and academic theologians vis-a-vis the way that people that we teach or to whom we minister really live.
What's more, this stubborn moralizing impulse is what makes American political fiction, even today, such watery and unsatisfying literature: It deprives writers of the best material.
The book's moralizing builds on Waterfield's notion of an "Olympic spirit of Greek cooperation." Although he admits that the Olympic truce of Greek antiquity was little more than a guarantee of safe passage for competitors and spectators to and from Olympia, he wants to believe that wars generally subsided.
In some papers, traditional approaches of textual analysis reveal a deep and enlightening dialogue between Ovid and subsequent authors: on the one hand, the Ovidian myth becomes the clue to the explanation of a later text (Zak 188-89: Narcissus's story provides the frame to understand the experience of the self in Petrarch); on the other hand, the moralizing attitude detected in Medieval reception of Ovid accounts for major discrepancies between Christian exegesis (of the commentaries on Metamorphoses) and pagan exegesis (of the visual programs related to commentaries), as Patricia Zalamea expounds ("At the Ovidian Pool: Christine de Pizan's Fountain of Wisdom as a Locus for Vision" 91-106).
As long as the Bill Bennetts of the world are intent on using not just persuasion but force (and public funds) on behalf of their favorite virtues--promoting premarital abstinence through federal programs, banning legal protections for same-sex unions, censoring sexually explicit materials, waging the war on drugs--libertarians can be forgiven for fearing even noncoercive moralizing on their part.
Bush's presidency and his use of "moralizing" rhetoric.
The lecture was delivered by Mohamed Moslih, member of the local council of Ulema (Muslim scholars) in the eastern city of Oujda, on "Friday sermon and its role in moralizing public life." The lecturer drew on the Koranic verse: "O ye who believe!
Winn frames his study in terms of three over-arching manifestations of the American Dream: Moralizing Mobility, featuring working class characters who desire upward mobility; Moralizing Failure, where characters fail to achieve upward mobility; and Moralizing the Material, where upper-class characters (emotionally) benefit from relationships with characters from a lower class.
Rather than emotional moralizing, preaching and individual conversion, the DVMG emphasized rational and scientific enlightenment and lobbying the state for changes in taxation, licensing laws and the legal treatment of drunkards.
German poet, novelist, and preacher known for moralizing, sentimental novels and for poems resembling folk songs.