morality

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morality

 [mo-ral´ĭ-te]
accordance with widely shared conventions of right or good conduct that form a stable, but usually incomplete, social consensus; it includes the concept of moral ideals. See also virtue.
principle-based common morality a type of ethical thinking based on premises that are unphilosophical common sense and tradition and come from the morality shared by members of a society. Principle-based theories have an emphasis on obligation and are pluralistic (in contrast to teleological and deontological theories, which are monistic, i.e., have one supreme, absolute principle supporting all other guides in the system). The principles are generally accepted in most types of ethical theory and are what are called “middle level” principles in that they are not the most general principles but are those likely to be acceptable to proponents of different normative theories. This type of thinking has been most influential in bioethics and in nursing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is why Wong constantly emphasizes that, in general, disagreements between moralities are not radical, i.e., they are not disagreements between entirely different sets of values.
After expounding his pluralistic relativism and its naturalistic basis, Wong examines both whether, by accepting a plurality of true moralities, one ends up losing confidence in one's commitments to a particular morality, and how one should act towards those who have (partially) different moral commitments.
Wong argues that his naturalistic approach, when applied to moral ambivalence, supports the denial of a single true morality and the existence of natural limits on the plurality of true moralities.
He does not resolve the conflict; nor does he try to reconcile the two moralities. He says to us, "If you try to act in war as you would at home, it will probably cost you your life." He doesn't say, "Don't do it."
He writes that "As John Rawls has moved to a political conception of justice which is meant only to include modern liberal societies, so moral point of view theories could be rationally reconstructed as attempting to give an accurate characterization of the core features of liberal moralities" (p.
The central difficulty here is that his wide-ranging reports of empirical research on the development of moral beliefs and feelings can be shown to apply to the moralities he abhors as well as to those he accepts.
(or moralities or moralites; 15th - 16th centuries) Allegorical dramas of the late Middle Ages.
The difference between the treatment of such gesture in the moralities and in Jonson's plays, Haynes argues, is that the latter, by substituting secular for divine causation, and linking social ills horizontally, avoids the ideological impasse of the morality, which closes off rather than opening up a clarifying rearticulation of social conflicts.
Clearly, there are several compelling moralities at play here--as there were in the European past Kertzer explores.
More generally, one has to share in a culture, with its moral concerns, in order to understand the music of different cultures and societies with their different moralities.