morality

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morality

 [mo-ral´ĭ-te]
accordance with widely shared conventions of right or good conduct that form a stable, but usually incomplete, social consensus; it includes the concept of moral ideals. See also virtue.
principle-based common morality a type of ethical thinking based on premises that are unphilosophical common sense and tradition and come from the morality shared by members of a society. Principle-based theories have an emphasis on obligation and are pluralistic (in contrast to teleological and deontological theories, which are monistic, i.e., have one supreme, absolute principle supporting all other guides in the system). The principles are generally accepted in most types of ethical theory and are what are called “middle level” principles in that they are not the most general principles but are those likely to be acceptable to proponents of different normative theories. This type of thinking has been most influential in bioethics and in nursing.
References in periodicals archive ?
"[L]ike her subject, O'Toole occasionally gets trapped by her own noble intentions: A biography called The Moralist, which takes Wilson's 'great sense of moral responsibility' as its starting point, surely sets up expectations for a deeper exploration of just where he drew that line." JENNIFER SZALAI
The Moralist suggests that Wilson's betrayal of black Americans was born from simple expedience -- that he allowed the segregation of the Civil Service because he desperately needed the votes of Southern congressmen to pass his progressive economic agenda, including the introduction of a federal income tax.
By now it is established that the TCA is not working, or at best functioning just that tiny inch above abysmal failure which allow advocates to puff up an argument for it.With the exception of aforementioned religious moralists who have all but annihilated a core value of the Dharma; tolerance.
Luckly, no major damage seems to have occurred to the House of the Moralist.
Riello, like any severe ironist, is a rigorous moralist; but he manages to view himself ironically as well--something that very few achieve.
She called herself an "obsessed moralist" and a "zealot of seriousness."
He was a professional educator, a writer, a man of the world, a historian, a lifetime baseball fan, a man everyone liked and trusted, and a moralist. And he had proved himself in a tragically truncated career as commissioner of baseball.
Since at least 1999, the Rhea County School Board has permitted the courses to be taught by students from nearby Bryan College, a private Christian college named in honor of William Jennings Bryan, the late 19th-century moralist politician who led a fundamentalist movement to prevent teaching of evolution in the public schools.
The dynamics of late-life marriage are thoughtfully penetrated without knee-jerk moralist sentiment.
This tradition can be traced to the Dominican moralist Raymond of Penafort (died 1275), master general and confessor to the pope.
Bat Washington, who defeated the mighty British Empire on the battlefield, was not only a great general but a great statesman and moralist. And so one wonders what Washington would think of the culture wars ravaging present-day America.
The Wells empire has always been unconventional in its practices, sometimes just by adhering to moralist tradition.