morality

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morality

 [mo-ral´ĭ-te]
accordance with widely shared conventions of right or good conduct that form a stable, but usually incomplete, social consensus; it includes the concept of moral ideals. See also virtue.
principle-based common morality a type of ethical thinking based on premises that are unphilosophical common sense and tradition and come from the morality shared by members of a society. Principle-based theories have an emphasis on obligation and are pluralistic (in contrast to teleological and deontological theories, which are monistic, i.e., have one supreme, absolute principle supporting all other guides in the system). The principles are generally accepted in most types of ethical theory and are what are called “middle level” principles in that they are not the most general principles but are those likely to be acceptable to proponents of different normative theories. This type of thinking has been most influential in bioethics and in nursing.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, apart from these, the summary statement encapsulating the decision procedure, the one to which this note refers, is rough in the sense that it includes one and omits three of what Rawls cites as jointly sufficient criteria for the justification of moral principles. The other three criteria (1951, 187-189) are as follows: (1) A moral principle must show a capacity to become accepted by competent moral judges after they have freely weighed its merits by criticism and open discussion and after each has thought it over and compared it with his or her own considered moral judgments.
(26) Does the moral reading entail that this judge should strike down laws that prohibit abortion, on the grounds that he accepts a moral principle to the effect that abortion is morally required?
Acting on our moral principles will enhance, not diminish, our quality of life by creating millions of good jobs in clean energy fields, supporting healthy families, and building vibrant communities.
For example, the moral principle expressed or conveyed by "Causing pain is wrong" could be that any token act of the type causing pain is pro tanto wrong in virtue thereof provided that it (also) instantiates the normative basis for causing pain's being a (contributory) wrong-making reason--i.e., provided that it is (also) a token of that basis type (2008, 87).
This account and analysis of the IGOs' experience is both instructive and heartening: It shows that moral principles can be adopted as a guide in global governance in some organizations.
School counselors can also look to moral principles or "shared beliefs or agreed-upon assumptions that guide the ethical reasoning of helping professionals" (Remley & Herlihy, 2001, p.
In the most general terms, the issue is whether sound moral judgment depends on a suitable provision of moral principles. But this leaves open a wide range of views.
Thus, a decision in a case may be justified by showing that it follows from moral principles that we (the justifiers) hold in reflective equilibrium.
That being the case, claims of pragmatic benefit need have no more appeal for irrealists than they have for realists, and irrealists need not choose a methodology for moral reasoning on the basis of its tendency to elicit moral principles that it would be useful for us to accept.
This surely flies in the face of a moral principle, and the moralist is thus apt to feel the negative answer to the question forced upon him.
Furthermore, it doesn't stand alone--it requires supplementation by other important moral principles and concerns, such as care and compassion.
SIR - Once again Shirley Bassey's lack of moral principle is making headlines.