ethics

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Related to moral philosophy: Moral philosophers

ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Warnock, Contemporary Moral Philosophy (London: Macmillan & Co., 1967).
Modern Moral Philosophy is regarded by many contemporary philosophers as the most important paper in ethics written in the last half of the 20th century, if not the most important paper written in the entire century.
Canto-Sperber not only holds up the history of moral philosophy as relevant and insightful, but she retells the grand story in her own fashion.
Tzachi Zamir's Double Vision: Moral Philosophy and Shakespearean Drama aims at sustaining this venerable tradition of criticism by showing how questions that concern philosophical inquiry help to bring out the complexity of Shakespeare's plays in flesh and interesting ways.
There are also a few factual errors marring this otherwise useful study (For example, although Witherspoon did rely in his moral philosophy lectures on Francis Hutcheson, Thomas Reid's influence on Witherspoon was negligible.) Morrison would also have done better to rely less on Perry Miller and William McLoughlin and more on Ruth Bloch, Jon Butler, Derek Davis, Nathan Hatch, and James Hutson when it came to charting the intersection of religious and revolutionary convictions.
At Bologna, where moral philosophy was not taught for many years in the sixteenth century, several professors discussed the work from philosophical and logical perspectives.
This news item was the starting point for Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven's latest project, "Anti-Sade." Paraphrasing the news report but changing terms like "the standard model of physics" and "antimatter" into "the standard model of moral philosophy" and "anti-Sade," the content acquired at times a subversive, allusive, and above all ironic tone.
Anscombe was a profound modern thinker whose three theses concerning modern moral philosophy are worth considering:
The prince has also investigated abortion and euthanasia as part of a moral philosophy course at St Andrews University.
And where it works artistically, and is not simply a matter of convention, it seems to be related to eudaimonism, the moral philosophy positing that happiness has a solid ethical base, or some exposition of the good life, which is a major factor in the successful achievement of eucatastrophe.
As befits the work of professor on the Committee for Social Thought at the University of Chicago, Kass's book, Life, Liberty and the Defense of Dignity: The Challenge for Bioethics, is first and foremost an academic work of moral philosophy. Much of it is an expansion of previously published essays, and some chapters are taken word for word.