moral


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to moral: Moral development

mor·al

(mōr'ăl)
1. Pertaining to the rightness or wrongness of an act.
2. Ethical; in accord with accepted rules of what is right.
3. Teaching or conveying a moral (i.e., a moral lession).

mor·al

(mōr'ăl)
1. Pertaining to the rightness or wrongness of an act.
2. Ethical; in accord with accepted rules of what is right.
References in classic literature ?
I know,--I can see it--you have, among other ways, been used to managing people with your eyes, letting your moral courage speak out through them, as it were.
`and the moral of THAT is--"Take care of the sense, and the sounds will take care of themselves."'
And the moral of that is--"Birds of a feather flock together."'
Many of them lack that unity of design, that close connection of the moral with the narrative, that wise choice in the introduction of the animals, which constitute the charm and excellency of true Aesopian fable.
The rhetoricians and philosophers were accustomed to give the Fables of Aesop as an exercise to their scholars, not only inviting them to discuss the moral of the tale, but also to practice and to perfect themselves thereby in style and rules of grammar, by making for themselves new and various versions of the fables.
If deeds and prayers and hopes and earnest thinking leave anywhere any moral effect, Mercy Farm and all around it have almost the right to be considered holy ground."
In the strife of ferocious parties, human nature always finds itself cherished; as the children of the convicts at Botany Bay are found to have as healthy a moral sentiment as other children.
Governments have their origin in the moral identity of men.
"Merely that it has not been so long known in morals, as the other countries of Christendom."
I wish I could say that his answer to the second (or moral) objection was equally clear and cogent.
I have no other moral than this to tag to the present story of "Vanity Fair." Some people consider Fairs immoral altogether, and eschew such, with their servants and families: very likely they are right.
'MANDEVILLE'S VOYAGE.' One of the earliest literary works of the period, however, was uninfluenced by these social and moral problems, being rather a very complete expression of the naive medieval delight in romantic marvels.