moor


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Related to moor: Moor religion

moor

an upland habitat usually dominated by heather growing on peat which is not normally waterlogged.
References in classic literature ?
After you left I sent down to Stamford's for the Ordnance map of this portion of the moor, and my spirit has hovered over it all day.
I fancy the yew alley, though not marked under that name, must stretch along this line, with the moor, as you perceive, upon the right of it.
"Daughter, is this true, what he says?" cried the Moor.
The Moor had hardly heard these words when with marvellous quickness he flung himself headforemost into the sea, where no doubt he would have been drowned had not the long and full dress he wore held him up for a little on the surface of the water.
The old wound opens again--and there I lie bleeding on the barren Shetland moor!
Before he abandons us on the moor, the man (at my suggestion) takes our " bearings," as correctly as he can by the help of my pocket-compass.
Mary felt as if the drive would never come to an end and that the wide, bleak moor was a wide expanse of black ocean through which she was passing on a strip of dry land.
There are stalwart Bedouins of the desert here, and stately Moors proud of a history that goes back to the night of time; and Jews whose fathers fled hither centuries upon centuries ago; and swarthy Riffians from the mountains--born cut-throats--and original, genuine Negroes as black as Moses; and howling dervishes and a hundred breeds of Arabs--all sorts and descriptions of people that are foreign and curious to look upon.
The Phoenicians, the Carthagenians, the English, Moors, Romans, all have battled for Tangier--all have won it and lost it.
My first contrivance was to make a pretence to speak to this Moor, to get something for our subsistence on board; for I told him we must not presume to eat of our patron's bread.
Our soldiers had recourse to their muskets, and four of them putting the mouths of their pieces to the heads of some of the most obstinate and turbulent, struck them with such a terror, that all the clamour was stilled in an instant; none received any hurt but the Moor who had been the occasion of the tumult.
To a man who has never seen the extraordinary nobility, strength, and grace that the devoted generations of ship-builders have evolved from some pure nooks of their simple souls, the sight that could be seen five-and-twenty years ago of a large fleet of clippers moored along the north side of the New South Dock was an inspiring spectacle.