moonshine

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A highly distilled corn whiskey often flavored with peaches, apples or other fruits, which is produced and distributed illegally to circumvent federal tax on alcohol

moonshine

Toxicology Illicitly distilled whiskey. See Lead poisoning, Saturnine gout.
References in periodicals archive ?
If and when a revenuer threatens to pay a visit, the local lawmen instantly alert the Bondurants, along with every other moonshiner in Franklin County, Virginia.
Our final stop was at the picturesque Glengoyne ("Valley of the Geese") Distillery, beneath a waterfall where, in times past, moonshiners had operated their illicit stills away from the prying eyes of excisemen.
The products are more experimental, said the owners of Corsair, who see themselves as "gentlemen pirates" inspired by "underground urban moonshiners."
In fact, one of America's favorite pastime--NASCAR--was born of the need of moonshiners to outrun the revenuers.
Moonshiners revel in their booming trade, until the Gardai get wind of their illegal activities 1979***
Perhaps the most maligned state in the Union, Arkansas has often been portrayed as a bastion of hillbillies, moonshiners, rednecks, and white trash.
The sport itself was an outgrowth of Prohibition, when moonshiners used tricked-out cars to outrun government agents.
Artisanal moonshiners are quietly brewing small batches in homes throughout America.
The narrator, a Vietnam vet from a long line of moonshiners, comes home from the war and decides to get into the marijuana business.
The truth is that the latest energy legislation and the continued push for ethanol by the government-backed moonshiners have much less to do with reality and much more to do with politics.
Even when one is able to think beyond the tired, old depictions of dirt-poor mountaineers, moonshiners, feudists like the Hatfields and McCoys, Protestant fundamentalists and snake-handlers, or the singers of old-time British ballads to the region's famously embattled coal miners, commonplace images, nonetheless, are of white "Anglo-Saxons." Appalachia's once large African American population is frequently overlooked.
"Why, there's nothing down there but moonshiners and wildlife," his companion replied.