Moon

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Related to moons: full moon

Moon

(mūn),
Henry, English surgeon, 1845-1892. See: Moon molars.

Moon

(mūn),
Robert C., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1844-1914. See: Laurence-Moon syndrome.
Drug slang noun A regional term for mescaline
Popular health noun See Full moon
Vox populi verb To display one's bared buttocks by lowering the backside of one's trousers and underpants, usually bending over. Mooning is done in the English-speaking world to express protest, scorn, disrespect, or provocation but can be done for shock value or fun.
References in classic literature ?
Regarding question four , "At what precise moment will the moon present herself in the most favorable position, etc.?"
-- After what has been said above, it will be necessary, first of all, to choose the period when the moon will be in perigee, and also the moment when she will be crossing the zenith, which latter event will further diminish the entire distance by a length equal to the radius of the earth, i.
But although the moon passes her perigee every month, she does not reach the zenith always at exactly the same moment .
But, in order that the moon should reach the zenith of a given place, it is necessary that the place should not exceed in latitude the declination of the luminary; in other words, it must be comprised within the degrees 0@ and 28@ of lat.
As to the sixth question, "What place will the moon occupy in the heavens at the moment of the projectile's departure?"
It ended with the double hypothesis: either the attraction of the moon would draw it to herself, and the travelers thus attain their end; or that the projectile, held in one immutable orbit, would gravitate around the lunar disc to all eternity.
First, errors of observation, concerning the distance of the projectile from the surface of the moon, for on the 11th of December it was impossible to see it; and what Joseph T.
Maston, was wasting his time, while leaning over the gigantic telescope he watched the course of the moon through the starry space.
"Two miles from Loo," went on Infadoos, "there is a hill curved like a new moon, a stronghold, where my regiment, and three other regiments which these chiefs command, are stationed.
"Welcome, white men from the Stars," he said; "this is another sight from that which your eyes gazed on by the light of last night's moon, but it is not so good a sight.
On they danced, looking faint and spiritual in the soft, sad light of the risen moon; now whirling round and round, now meeting in mimic warfare, swaying, eddying here and there, coming forward, falling back in an ordered confusion delightful to witness.
"I am waiting for that eclipse," I answered; "I have had my eye on the moon for the last half-hour, and I never saw it look healthier."