monozygous

(redirected from monozygosity)

monozygotic

 [mon″o-zi-got´ik; mon″o-zi´gus] (monozygous) pertaining to or derived from a single zygote (fertilized ovum); said of twins. See also dizygotic.
A, Monozygotic twinning. The single inner cell mass divides into two inner cell masses during the blastocyst stage. These twins have a single placenta and chorion, but each twin develops in its own amnion. B, Dizygotic twinning. Two ova are released during ovulation, and each is fertilized by a separate spermatozoon. The ova may implant near each other in the uterus, or they may be far apart. From McKinney et al., 2000.

mon·o·zy·got·ic twins

twins resulting from one zygote that at an early stage of development separated into independently growing cell aggregations giving rise to two individuals of the same sex and identical genetic constitution.

u·ni·ger·mi·nal

(yū'ni-jer'mi-năl),
Relating to a single germ or zygote, for example, monozygotic.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were 127,762 and 127,186 SNVs present in each twin, respectively, and 124,185 (97.4%) of the SNVs were shared between the twins, supporting their monozygosity. Twin 1 and twin 2 shared 79.7% of the total SNPs with their father and 80.0% with their mother, providing proof of the biological relationship of the family.
Research shows that the closest correlation to DNA test results on monozygosity is the twins' own opinion, which was reported to be 95% correct.
When the data suggest monozygosity, the noninvasive aneuploidy test could be applied, as long as the total fractional fetal DNA concentration exceeds the minimum stipulated by the test protocol, e.g., 4% (21).
Increasing birth length (P = 0.038), nonsmoking of the mother during pregnancy (P = 0.002), and monozygosity (0.012) were also significant predictors for atopic dermatitis in the whole sample when ignoring the familial relationship between the twins (Table 1).
Al Mufti, "The Phenomenon of Monozygosity: Spontaneous Zygotic Splitting," in Multiple Pregnancy: Epidemiology, Gestation, and Perinatal Outcome, 2nd ed., ed.
The phenomenon of monozygosity in iatrogenic pregnancies.