monosodium glutamate


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monosodium glutamate

 [mon″o-so´de-um]
a salt of glutamic acid, used as a pharmaceutic necessity, and also used to enhance the flavor of foods. See also Chinese restaurant syndrome.

mon·o·so·di·um glu·ta·mate (MSG),

(mon'ō-sō'dē-ŭm glū'tă-māt),
The monosodium salt of the naturally occurring l form of glutamic acid; used as a flavor enhancer that is a cause or contributing factor to colloquially named "Chinese restaurant" syndrome; also used intravenously as an adjunct in treatment of encephalopathies associated with hepatic disease.

monosodium glutamate

/mono·so·di·um glu·ta·mate/ (-so´de-um) the monosodium salt of -glutamic acid, used as a pharmaceutic necessity and to enhance the flavor of foods.

monosodium glutamate (MSG)

[-sō′dē·əm]
a food flavor enhancer derived from naturally occurring salt of glutamic acid and a cause of Chinese restaurant syndrome. It is also used in the treatment of encephalopathies associated with liver disorders. Also called sodium glutamate.

MSG

A flavour-enhancing amino acid used in processed, packaged and fast foods, which is an excitatory neurotransmitter and neurotoxin. Other sources with up to 40% MSG include autolysed yeast, calcium caseinate, sodium caseinate, and hydrolysed and texturised proteins.
 
Toxicity
Headaches, heart palpitations, skin flushing, tightness of the chest. MSG may cause convulsions when injected into the peritoneal cavity of experimental animals, stimulating neurons until they die, an effect that has been implicated in brain damage in strokes, hypoglycaemia, trauma, seizures, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s diseases and Guam-type amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; domoic aoid, a potent glutamate analogue, may cause toxic poisoning in mussel eaters, possibly causing an Alzheimer’s-like disease.

mon·o·so·di·um glu·ta·mate

(MSG) (mon'ō-sō'dē-ŭm glū'tă-māt)
The monosodium salt of the naturally occurring l form of glutamic acid; used as a flavor enhancer that is a cause or contributing factor to colloquially named "Chinese restaurant" syndrome; also used intravenously as an adjunct in treatment of encephalopathies associated with hepatic disease.

monosodium glutamate

The sodium salt of glutamic acid produced by acids or enzyme action on vegetable protein such as wheat gluten or soya bean. Monosodium glutamate is used as a culinary seasoning and flavouring agent and is believed to be responsible for the CHINESE RESTAURANT SYNDROME. Also known as Ajinomoto, Vetsin, Chinese seasoning, Accent or Zest.

mon·o·so·di·um glu·ta·mate

(MSG) (mon'ō-sō'dē-ŭm glū'tă-māt)
Monosodium salt of naturally occurring levorotatory form of glutamic acid; used as a flavor enhancer that is a cause or contributing factor to the colloquially named "Chinese restaurant" syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dong, Monosodium glutamate avoidance for chronic asthma in adults and children, Cochrane Database Syst.
Levenson, "Hypothalamic-pituitary function in adult rats treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate," Endocrinology, vol.
The best way to avoid monosodium glutamate (MSG) is to eat food made from fresh ingredients.
Developed by a Japanese professor almost 100 years ago, monosodium glutamate is a salt of glutamic acid, which is an amino acid and building block of protein.
Monosodium Glutamate, or MSG, best-known as an ingredient in Chinese take-aways, is the latest additive to come under the spotlight.
Restaurant owner Louis Cheng prefers using chicken broth instead of monosodium glutamate (MSG) to flavor the Asian cuisine he serves at Pacific Rim Coast in Sterling, Virginia.
This dreamlike eight-minute piece features a naked Joo swimming in two thousand pounds of crystallized monosodium glutamate, performing a parody of evolution (swimming, then crawling, then standing) in the Great Salt Flats of Utah, and serving as a human salt lick for an elk in South Korea's northern mountains.
said Wednesday its new factory in Thailand has begun producing nucleotide seasonings, used to add flavor to monosodium glutamate.
For example, monosodium glutamate, the widely-used flavour enhancer, was found to cause damage to eyesight when fed to rats in huge quantities.
Common triggers that can be avoided include caffeinated coffee, tea and cola, as well as processed meats, monosodium glutamate (MSG), aged cheese, nuts, alcohol, vinegar, citrus fruits and onions.