monosaccharide


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monosaccharide

 [mon″o-sak´ah-rīd]
a simple sugar; a carbohydrate that cannot be broken down to simpler substances by hydrolysis. Subgroups include the aldoses and the ketoses.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mon·o·sac·cha·ride

(mon'ō-sak'ă-rīd),
A carbohydrate that cannot form any simpler sugar by simple hydrolysis, for example, pentoses, hexoses.
Synonym(s): monose
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

monosaccharide

(mŏn′ə-săk′ə-rīd′, -rĭd)
n.
Any of several carbohydrates, such as tetroses, pentoses, and hexoses, that cannot be broken down to simpler sugars by hydrolysis. Also called simple sugar.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

monosaccharide

Simple sugar A monomer of a more complex carbohydrate Examples Glucose, fructose, galactose. Cf Disaccharide, Polysaccharide.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mon·o·sac·cha·ride

(mon'ō-sak'ă-rīd)
A carbohydrate that cannot form any simpler sugar by simple hydrolysis; e.g., pentoses, hexoses.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

monosaccharide

The simplest form of sugar. Monosaccharides are classified by the number of carbon atoms in the molecule. They may thus be trioses, tetroses, pentoses, hexoses, etc. The commonest monosaccharide in the body is GLUCOSE, which is a hexose, with six carbons.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
Monosaccharideclick for a larger image
Fig. 224 Monosaccharide . Molecular structures of (a) glucose, (b) fructose.

monosaccharide

a carbohydrate MONOMER, a simple sugar with the formula (CH2O)n, e.g. C6H12 O6 glucose and fructose. See Fig. 224 . Such carbohydrates are generally white, crystalline solids, with a sweet taste, and are usually soluble in water. The carbon chain forming the backbone of such sugars can be of varying lengths. Some monosaccharides contain only three carbons (‘triose’ types such as glyceraldehyde) others contain five carbons (‘pentose’ types such as the deoxyribose sugar of DNA), but those with six carbons (‘hexose’ types such as glucose) are the most important since they can be joined together by CONDENSATION REACTIONS (loss of water) to form DISACCHARIDES and POLYSACCHARIDES.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Collagen was modified by reducing monosaccharides in this study to imitate the changes, which spontaneously take place with aging and cause age-related atrophic changes in tissues.
The neutral monosaccharide composition of S-3-1, based on retention times and peak areas, was determined to be Rha, Ara, Xyl, Man, Gal, and Glc in molar ratio 0.35 : 0.37 : 1.4 : 0.31 : 3 : 0.8.
cerevisiae (ATCC2341) to consume galactose, showed the yeast was able to take this monosaccharide at concentrations of 50 to 120 g [L.sup.-1], producing a maximum ethanol concentration of 54.0 g [L.sup.-1] and lower [eta] (88%) than [Sc.sub.Gal]-[B.sub.Gal].
Of the large variety of ways in which monosaccharide building blocks can be linked together, apparently only one leads to success.
Sugar transporters mediate the import of sucrose, monosaccharides (such as glucose, mannose, and fructose), and polyols (such as mannitol, sorbitol, and galactinol) [4].
PMP, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one, and monosaccharides produce monosaccharides-PMP monosaccharide derivatives under the condition of alkaline and quantitative condensation.
All [alpha]-amylases (EC 3.2.1.1) act on starch (polysaccharide) as the main substrate and yield small units of glucose (monosaccharide) and maltose (disaccharide) (Figure 2).
The filtrate containing monosaccharide and disaccharides was put in an oven until complete dryness then dissolved in 20 mL of distilled water.
The molecular weight of MHP-1 was determined to be 8.8 x 103 Da, and monosaccharide analysis showed that MHP-1 was composed of mannose, galactose, and glucose at the ratio of 5:2:3.
Maintenance of villus height and crypt depth, and enhancement of disaccharide digestion and monosaccharide absorption, in piglets fed on cows' whole milk after weaning.